Prion: Episode 2

Posted on 01 March 2011 by WarriorAdmin

Derrick jumped to his feet and scanned the horizon, eagerly watching for movement. The noise of the helicopter, echoing across the flat landscape, seemed to come from nowhere in particular, but its intensity continued to increase steadily. After a moment, the lone aircraft came into view over a small patch of forest, two or three miles southwest of the town.

Rummaging hastily in his munitions satchel, Derrick produced a flare gun and a couple of cartridges. He glanced over his shoulder as he loaded the pistol. The helicopter was less than two miles distant now, and it was still heading right for Ashby. He couldn’t make out much detail, but it appeared that the aircraft was standard commercial fare, judging by its small size and inconspicuous paint job. Raising the flare gun, he prepared to announce his presence.

Even as he did so, the approaching aircraft veered to the left and plunged downwards. Regaining stability for a moment, it repeated the alarming maneuver and then entered into a tailspin. Astonished, Derrick watched as the helicopter whirled out of sight behind a wooded ridge. Seconds later, he heard the sound of the impact.

“Holy shit!” he exclaimed. “That’ll bring ‘em swarmin’ for sure.”

If there were any survivors out there, Derrick knew it wouldn’t be long before they were in serious danger. Grabbing his flashlight and shotgun, he opened the hatch and made his way back down into the dark room at the base of the water tower. All was quiet there, and the door was still shut fast.

As soon as he emerged from the tower, Derrick scurried to the truck and removed the suppressed rifle from his gun rack. He looked about cautiously as he cycled a .338 round into the chamber – there was no movement as of yet. Although he couldn’t see the helicopter, a distant column of black smoke left no doubt as to its location, and he struck out immediately in that direction. Crossing the road, he passed through the school’s weed-infested baseball field and out into the desolate farm country.

After about a half an hour, he approached the stand of trees beyond which he knew the helicopter must lie. The ground rose abruptly here, forming a little, wooded island in the midst of the surrounding grasslands. As he proceeded up the hill, the air became increasingly laden with smoke and the oppressive smell of burning fuel. Spluttering a bit, he reached the summit and looked down through the haze.

Twenty or thirty yards below him sat the mangled fuselage. When it crashed, the small aircraft had crumpled against the rocky hillside like an aluminum can, exploding into flames. Even now, the blaze continued unabated, fueled by an abundance of leftover propellant – it was not likely that anybody had survived the crash.

Derrick ventured out from the woods and examined the wreckage. As he picked his way between patches of fire and helicopter fragments, he observed a darkened mass to his left, near the central conflagration – with a shudder he realized that it was a human torso. The remains had been transformed hideously by the intense heat. The flesh was blackened and emaciated, and the eyeless face looked like a strange, leathery mask. The right arm of the corpse had been wrenched off and lay at some distance from its body.

A thorough search of the debris yielded no further discoveries, and Derrick concluded that the dead man had come alone. He felt disappointed. It had been half a year at least since he had last talked to anyone, and he would have welcomed a little friendly banter. He sighed and looked skyward. The sun was floating high in a sea of azure, and it reminded him that it was nearly midday. He still needed to get supplies, but he didn’t feel like dallying in Ashby another night in order to do so. Shouldering his rifle, he started back up the slope.

All of a sudden, he checked his pace. What was that? Retracing a couple steps, he peered among the rocks and tall grasses off to his right. There was something white on the ground over there, maybe five yards distant, but he couldn’t get a clear view of what it was. Grabbing hold of his rifle, he advanced warily towards the spot.

He came upon the body of a young woman lying in the grass. Her eyes were closed and her upturned face looked deathly pale. She was dressed in a white tank top and well-worn jeans, both of which bore bloodstains from a number of superficial cuts and abrasions. Her long auburn hair was matted with blood from an ugly gash along the scalp. Crouching beside the woman, Derrick pressed his fingertips to her neck. Her skin was cold to the touch but, to his surprise, he perceived a faint pulse. He removed his outer jacket and wrapped her in it against the chill autumn wind.

***

“Hey lady, can you hear me?” asked a strange voice. “My name’s Derrick. Don’t worry, I’m gonna help you.”

“Au…drey,” whispered Audrey faintly.

She tried opening her eyes, but it felt like there were enormous weights attached to the lids and she quickly gave up.

“Glad to know you,” continued Derrick’s voice.

“Wh. . . wh. . . where?” stammered Audrey weakly.

“Nowhere safe, that’s for sure,” said Derrick’s voice, “in a field outside of Ashby, Minnesota. Don’t worry though, everything’s gonna be just fine. Now just take it easy and I’m gonna carry you.”

***

Derrick was apprehensive as he bore Audrey towards town. He was trying hard not to jar the injured woman, yet at the same time speed was imperative. Bloodied as she was, it would be nearly impossible for them to avoid detection by a keen predator, so the sooner they got inside the water tower, the better. He looked up. Ashby was extremely close. Suddenly, an eerie cry rang out across the bleak landscape.

“They’re finally on the hunt,” said Derrick.

…TO BE CONTINUED…

by Mike Goetz
[email protected]

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“The Beaux Stratagem” to debut at Marquette Thursday: squabbles, deceit, romance and action all in one play

Posted on 10 November 2010 by WarriorAdmin

Marquette University’s Department of Performing Arts will be presenting the great romantic comedy “The Beaux Stratagem” by Farquar at Helfaer Theatre this week.

This play takes place in 1707 in the countryside of England. Tom Aimwell (played by junior Tim Braun) and Jack Archer (played by senior John Gallagher) disguise themselves in the countryside after loosing their fortunes on drinking and gambling. Their plan, or stratagem, is to seduce ladies of fortune and status to get what they want: money.

Aimwell and Archer, however, must rethink each plan because of many obstacles of love, bandits and married women.

Suspicion and Disguise is an on going theme with this play, for many of the characters seem to be hiding something, whether it be their knowledge of events or others’ true identities, or their own  identities.

Obstacles of love are used in a comedic style that are lively and entertaining. Rapid banter makes it very exciting to watch.

Many fans of modern romantic comedy will see numerous similarities with Restoration comedy. Restoration comedy has many of the same themes one would see in “chick flicks.” For example, characters that can’t stand each other will end up falling in love, and love will always win out in the end.

The script creates an interesting view of conflict between marriage and love with a witty touch of humor. At one point in the play the drunken husband Squire Sullen, has a soliloquy to the audience about his woes of marriage and confusion of women.

Summing up the play’s views of marriage, a central theme, Sullen says: “What is difficult about marriage? EVERYTHING!” Later he admits, “Unlike wine, men do not improve with age.”

Archer might have agreed with Sullen when he said, “Was there ever a more pathetic creature than a man in love.”

The actors’ delivery of quick, witty banter and comedic lines creates humor in this play. Despite some of the difficult vocabulary, the play is very easy to follow due to the actors great body language.

The fight choreography of fast-paced swordplay and action is definitely worth the price of admission. To add to the excitement, the ladies will get a chance to fence, showing their versatility in talent. Not only is there fencing, but guns are also a part of this fast-paced play.  There is never a dull moment when, in a moment’s notice, someone can pull out a sword or a gun.

Marquette’s production of “The Beaux Stratagem” is visually astounding; the costumes and set bring the audience into the time and place. The technical aspects of the show are exquisite. Student Lex Gernon, who works as part of the scene shop as well as a primary painter for this set, said “the primary style was an etching style, 2D, and inspired by the art of the 1700s.”

One of the fascinating things about this set is the flying backdrops. Much of the scenery is flown in very effectively with a script title on each backdrop informing the audience of the setting. When entering the Helfear, you will immediately be swept into the play by the beautiful proscenium set pieces. 

One of the many difficulties with this show, besides set and costume, was the British dialect.  There were two main dialects: an upper class and a lower class. Dialect coach Todd Denning worked with each class of actors in groups for the beginning of rehearsals. Later, each actor worked with Todd independently to master the dialect line by line.

There were several exercises that helped many of the actors. One exercise was to listen to a CD teaching them the dialect. Others found it helpful to speak in the dialect continually, staying in character even when off stage. The most helpful exercise, according to actors, was having an immersion night. At this rehearsal, the actors became their characters and had a tea party. Those who were upper class were served by the lower class. It helped the actors find the mannerisms as well as the dialects of their characters.

“The Beaux Strategem” is a whimsically funny play with many great aspects of entertainment: squabbles, deceit, romance and action. While watching the play, the great chemistry between all the actors and their enjoyment in what they do is obvious. Their energy is prevalent throughout the entire play and rubs off onto the audience. This domino effect is the true mark of a great show. 

Students tickets cost $10. General public tickets cost $16 to $20. Discounts are offered to senior citizens and alumni.

by Carly Kroll
[email protected]

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Drawing in students: Haggerty seeks to increase involvement with free art classes

Posted on 24 February 2010 by Warrior Staff

The Haggerty Museum of Art hosted a drawing workshop in the galleries Friday, the first of three free classes for Student Fridays taught by MIAD drawing major and alum Jeff Sama. Twenty to 30 Marquette students ranging in art experience sketched Thomas Woodruff’s “Freak Parade,” a travelling collection painted with vibrant pastels and translucent acrylics, lasting from Jan. 27- April 18.

Curator of Education Lynne Shumow, who has worked at the Haggerty for ten years, described Woodruff’s gallery as “celebrating the beauty in aberrance.” She explained its focus on the beauty in the difference of people. Woodruff, who took five years to complete the collection, used inspiration from his experiences and historical knowledge in painting his movie and circus posters. This is the Student Fridays’ second year at the Haggerty, Shumow said.

Drawing instructor Jeff Sama said he tries to create a relaxing environment during the classes. “My philosophy is keep everything low key and no stress. I joke around a lot,” drawing instructor Jeff Sama said. “My goal is to create an environment where their (students) brains are working a little differently then they usually
are throughout their day. Kids come in from all majors with little or no experience or with some experience, but I’m just showing them little things here and there… Then they can do it on the page, and it just activates that creative side that may not be working throughout their normal, everyday lives.”

The next two drawing classes in the Student Fridays series scheduled for Fridays Feb. 12 and 19 from 1 to 3 p.m., feature permanent collections “The Northern Masters,” prints by Bol, Durer, Goltzius, Saenredam and van Heemskerck, and “Old Master Paintings.” All students are welcome to come and go at their leisure with free admission and supplies. To register, contact Lynne Shumow at 414-288-5915 or [email protected].

Students also have the opportunity to submit a maximum of two art pieces in any medium to be displayed on Student Fine Arts Night Wed March 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. The open art gallery will include free food, refreshments and live music. Students must submit their art by Feb. 24. Further art requirements are posted on the Haggerty’s Web site.

If you are interested in submitting work and do not know how to present your artwork for hanging and display, Haggerty preparator artist Dan Herro is going over different presentation methods at a workshop Feb. 12 from 3 to 4 p.m.

by Melanie Pawlyszyn
[email protected]

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Blatz Beer Column: Fans of hard cider unite! Why Strongbow is where its at

Posted on 18 November 2009 by Katelyn Ferral

By Katelyn Ferral
Fans of hard cider unite!
My quiver’s full: why Strongbow is where its at
I’ll admit it, when it comes to my alcoholic beverages I’m a full-on, stereotypical girly woman.
I like my booze like I like my men: sweet and flavorful. Boone’s Farm, anyone?
No, but really, I’ve never liked beer. And believe me, its been a rough four years with an aversion like that.  I’ve never experienced all the things real college kids are supposed to experience: never had that magical beer pong moment of friendship and camaraderie, never downed a 12 pack from a beer bong like all the hardcore kids, never did a keg stand (well, for more than .2 seconds and least) and never strolled up to a local bar and demanded a cold Miller like one of the boys.
Yep, it’s been Boone’s Farm (Melon ball flavor, obviously) Mike’s Hard Lemonade and Amaretto sours for me, that is until I was captivated by hard cider.
Straight-up hard cider. From the U.K, no less.
That’s right, I may not have met my soul mate at Marquette but I have found my intoxicating significant other in Strongbow, the “authentic English cider with a dry and refreshing finish.”
It’s a good thing I finally found Strongbow. Not only do I feel cooler ordering at the bar, but this drink’s apple infused overtones mixed with a hard edge is immensely satisfying. In fact as I sit here writing this, drinking my Strongbow, I’m feeling pretty darn satisfied, dare I say even delighted. Hard cider has that affect on people.
Strongbow is an import cider first mulled into existence by the late H.P. Bulmer in 1887. Largely considered the “household name in cider,” Strongbow is named after the knight Richard de Clare, later Earl of Pembroke, nicknamed “Strongbow” for relying heavily on Welsh archers during campaigns in Ireland, where the native Irish had few bows.
Strongbow has 5.0% alcohol volume in a 12oz bottle, but it’s barely noticeable with its golden radiance and sweet essence that permeates the mouth upon sippage. This hard cider accounts for over half of the cider sold in England and is pretty top-shelf because it is produced with a Royal Warrant; aka: even the Queen is obsessed.

Strongbow has slight similarities to beer, but the overall taste, presentation and awesomeness-factor is much better. Trust me on this one. With its crisp and authentic current of taste-bud bliss with every swig, you couldn’t choose a better beverage for your night out (or in, for that matter)

I’ll admit it, when it comes to my alcoholic beverages I’m a full-on, stereotypical girly woman.

I like my booze like I like my men: sweet and flavorful. Boone’s Farm, anyone?

No, but really, I’ve never liked beer. And believe me, its been a rough four years with an aversion like that.  I’ve never experienced all the things real college kids are supposed to experience: never had that magical beer pong moment of friendship and camaraderie, never downed a 12 pack from a beer bong like all the hardcore kids, never did a keg stand (well, for more than .2 seconds and least) and never strolled up to a local bar and demanded a cold Miller like one of the boys.

Yep, it’s been Boone’s Farm (Melon ball flavor, obviously) Mike’s Hard Lemonade and Amaretto sours for me, that is until I was captivated by hard cider.

Straight-up hard cider. From the U.K, no less.

That’s right, I may not have met my soul mate at Marquette but I have found my intoxicating significant other in Strongbow, the “authentic English cider with a dry and refreshing finish.”

It’s a good thing I finally found Strongbow. Not only do I feel cooler ordering at the bar, but this drink’s apple infused overtones mixed with a hard edge is immensely satisfying. In fact as I sit here writing this, drinking my Strongbow, I’m feeling pretty darn satisfied, dare I say even delighted. Hard cider has that affect on people.

Strongbow is an import cider first mulled into existence by the late H.P. Bulmer in 1887. Largely considered the “household name in cider,” Strongbow is named after the knight Richard de Clare, later Earl of Pembroke, nicknamed “Strongbow” for relying heavily on Welsh archers during campaigns in Ireland, where the native Irish had few bows.

Strongbow has 5.0% alcohol volume in a 12oz bottle, but it’s barely noticeable with its golden radiance and sweet essence that permeates the mouth upon sippage. This hard cider accounts for over half of the cider sold in England and is pretty top-shelf because it is produced with a Royal Warrant; aka: even the Queen is obsessed.

Strongbow has slight similarities to beer, but the overall taste, presentation and awesomeness-factor is much better. Trust me on this one. With its crisp and authentic current of taste-bud bliss with every swig, you couldn’t choose a better beverage for your night out (or in, for that matter).

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Fashion Ninja in Third Ward brings fashion design to Milwaukee

Posted on 24 February 2009 by Amy Wilson

The best part of Marquette’s location being near downtown Milwaukee is all of the hidden treasures that can be found when you are least looking. The Fashion Ninja in the Third Ward is one of these treasures.

The Fashion Ninja is located on Plankinton in the Indie Fashion Market just before St.Paul. At first glance, it looks like an ordinary fashion store. There are designer pieces for sale in the front of the store. There are small batches that are made some are even limited to only a dozen pieces. These pieces are sold from the founder of Fashion Ninja, Arika Ikeler, but can also be found online. In the back of store is where classes are held.

According to the school’s Web site, “‘The Fashion Ninja School of Sewing and Design’ was founded by Arika Ikeler in 2003. Since the school has grown into a supportive sewing and design community for individuals interested in learning more about Fashion Design. Arika is the fashion designer who helps others learn about fashion design. She instructs specifically tailored advice and strategies to encourage her students to execute their own design ideas successfully.”

Arika is the only instructor at Fashion Ninja. There are 2 classes, a beginning and an intermediate level class. The classes cost $385 for an 8 hour class. The beginner’s level course is called Introduction to Clothing Construction. This class requires no prior experience, and offers the basics of clothing construction in one day. The objective is to learn how to operate a sewing machine, create successful seams, adjust machine controls, change the needle, and learn how to engineer clothing. This class provides a solid foundation in building upper body garments, pattern development, textiles, and types of seams, seam finishes, sleeve installation, best construction order, quality engineering, and the creativity in fashion design. Sewing machines are available for students to use. The intermediate level course is The Art of Fashion Draping and involves the fundamentals of draping a design on a dress form, making a pattern from the draped design, and construction techniques, stressing the importance of proper fit, sizing a design, and craftsmanship.

The next two classes are March 27 & 28, Construction and Draping respectively. In April,Construction is the 24th and Draping is on the 25th. For more information go to www.fashionninja.com or stop by or even call.

by Amy Wilson
[email protected]

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Cherry Orchard is caricature of idealism and change

Posted on 21 November 2008 by Molly Petitjean

The Cherry Orchard opened last Thursday to a sizable audience. While the play was okay, the selection was poor for the season. The subject matter was extremely depressing for a season when days getting shorter and gloomy become the norm; the play was ill-placed in the theatre lineup. This selection in the spring would depress fewer people.

I overheard one audience member say, “This play is so depressing! It is so hard to watch. It isn’t the performers’ fault, just the time of the year.”

Anton Chekov’s play is about a family waiting to discover if they will lose their house and orchard after failing to keep up interest payments on their mortgage. The family returns home after a prolonged stay in Paris. They quickly realize that any and all money they had is gone, and the house is being put up for auction.

One of the most recognizable themes of play is that problems arise through clinging to the past instead of preparing for the future. This is of historical importance because Chekov wrote this play for a Russian audience on the verge of revolution.

The character Peter Trofimov acts as Chekov’s personal mouthpiece for idealism and change. At one point in the play, he places himself above human emotion, noting that he and Ana, who he is affectionate towards, are “above love.”

Trofimov spouts line upon line of philosophical progression but is mocked by some of the characters for not having graduated university even though he has been there several years.
The emotional demand of the script on the actors proved to be the biggest challenge of the play. Unfortunately, these emotional instances were often overacted and failed to produce a reaction from the audience. One of the biggest demands came from the character Lyuba Ranevsky who ran the gamut of emotions. She did, at one point, produce real tears in a touching display at the climax of the plot. However, even she faltered into overdone productions in place of subdued and weighty displays of emotion. The Cherry Orchard required much more of the latter.

The character that the audience clearly responded to best was the elderly servant, Firs. A well-acted and comedic break from the depressing play he was written into, Firs allowed the audience to laugh and reconnect to the action taking place onstage. His interjections and senile ravings generated hearty chuckles and reminded the audience of the past this family so desperately clung onto.

One of the best experiences of the night was the set design by Rachel Finn, a senior in the College of Communication. It is great to see that the university utilizes its student talent and encourages large solo projects to those who prove capable of the challenge.

The stage was sparsely set and largely representative – allowing the audience to create their own version of the estate. Coupled with the lighting design, the mood was well-set, and there was a clear sense of nostalgia associated with the large property the family is on the verge of losing.

The greatest scenic feat came in the last seconds of the play when the cherry orchard was artfully and symbolically chopped down. Overall, this play was not the most entertaining of the season and sometimes lagged in action and acting, but it was a challenge for all involved. The theatre department deserves praise for at least attempting this feat, even though it faltered a bit.

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Tim Gunn in Milwaukee

Posted on 21 November 2008 by Nick Roberts

This past Thursday, my friend Lizzi and I went on an adventure to Brookfield Square mall to see the infamous Tim Gunn of Project Runway. He was at the Boston Store doing a fashion show promoting Liz Claiborne, where he holds the position of Chief Creative Officer. Unfortunately, I was unable to get a picture with Tim because you had to buy $100 worth of Liz Claiborne apparel in order to meet him. However, we were able to get pictures of him and of the fashion show.
Throughout the show Gunn stressed several points:

1. Buy clothes for the body you have now
2. Think of your body in terms of thirds, and not two halves, and dress accordingly
3. Use accessories to update looks you already have
4. When buying clothes remember these three concepts: silhouette, proportion and fit

To see more photos, check out my blog, Make It Work Milwaukee.

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Run up to the runway: Milwaukee Art Museum After Dark

Posted on 06 November 2008 by Nick Roberts

On October 17, I had the opportunity to attend Milwaukee Art Museum After Dark: Run Up to the Runway. Run Up to the Runway is a fashion show runway event sponsored by the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra League’s Evening Associates in collaboration with the Milwaukee Art Museum. The event was created four years ago, with only 75 people in attendance. By this year, it had grown to a total of 1300 people attending. The event showcased designers from Mount Mary College, Milwaukee designers Amanda Ergen, Delanie Seamon and Mink, as well as local retailers Aala Reed, Shop and Valentina.

I arrived at the MAM at about 8 p.m. to a large mass of people in Windhover Hall. The large ceiling was adorned with soft purple lighting with Run Up to the Runway shown over it. There was a large white catwalk that measured about 30 feet with about 100 white chairs surrounding it. The fashion show was not to start until 9 p.m., so my friend Anna and I went to check out the new exhibit, Art/React, which I highly recommend to anyone who visits the museum. As the name implies, the exhibit consisted of pieces of art that reacted to the individual. These ranged from a white canvas, which would record your movements that would then play on a video loop with twelve other black silhouettes that had been recorded earlier from others who stepped in front of the canvas, to a wooden table in a very soft lit room, that when you touched the table, different sentences would ring out of the speakers that surrounded the room.

By the time my friend and I were finished exploring the new exhibit, it was almost time for the runway show. Before the show began, students from Mt. Mary’s College were displaying their designs on the catwalk. The designs of the students varied greatly. From a ballerina-inspired dress in a light pink, purple and red, to a brown leather dress with a leaf adorned corset, with long black strips of fabric lying over a torn brown skirt. The winning look was a high-waisted gold pencil skirt with a large gold rosette, paired with a sleek black sleeveless turtleneck.

After the announcement of the winner, the show began. The first designers to display their work in the runway were Amanda Ergen and Mink. My favorite of their five dresses was an off-white dress that was gathered at the shoulder with a purpose flower. The fabric was nicely draped, creating a flow to the dress as the model walked down the runway. Next was the collection from Delanie Seamom. Her collection showed a great deal of range, offering different looks, and some of her clothes were my favorites of the night. I really enjoyed her last outfit, which consisted of a ruffled mini-skirt in eggplant with a fitted corset top in steel grey. It was topped with a wool swing jacket in yellow. What I liked most about this outfit was how the yellow jacket really brought to life the eggplant and steel colors. Sometimes when there is a bright color, it can distract from the other aspects of the outfit; however, the jacket complimented those colors and made for a well-put together look.

Next up was Shop. What really caught my attention during their show was an outfit which consisted of a simple purple scarf, a Mink Pink soldier jacket in black, and a brown to black whirlpool print dress. It seems that this season many designers are embracing the structure of the military jacket. I like this coat because it plays with the idea of masculinity and femininity. Its use of design and structure gives it that masculine feel, while the cut and shape of the jacket maintains its femininity with the cinched waist, smaller armholes and soft, slender shoulders.

Next on the runway was Aala Reed Men’s. To be honest, I was not crazy about the looks Aala Reed Men’s put together. The first outfit was a sequined Superman logo t-shirt with a pair of jeans that had a great deal of embroidery on them that I thought it could do without. The high point in their collection was a Ted Baker jacket with a Hugo Boss turtleneck and dark skinny jeans. The jacket embodies a militaristic feel with its double-breasted closure, stiff structure and use of epaulets.

Following Aala Reed Men’s was Aala Reed Women’s. I must say that Aala Reed Women’s put on a much better show than their male counterpart. I really liked two pieces in their collection. First was a deep v-neck halter dress in a midnight navy by Ingwa-Malero. The second was a Ted Baker “Lola” dress. What I liked about this dress was its uses of geometric shapes to create an intriguing and beautiful silhouette. Sometimes geometric patterns on a dress can make the dress seem busy or confusing and the dress gets lost in a mess of shapes, but this dress was not like that. The last to show was Molloy’s, who provided the audience with a variety of beautiful dresses. My favorites were a black and gold brocade cocktail dress and red charmeuse one-shoulder gown, which swayed back and forth on the runway as the model walked.

Overall, I thought the event was a great success. I saw many things I liked, and some things I did not. It is nice to see a growing community of people who are interested in fashion and that Milwaukee is trying to create a name for itself with some of the young designers who reside here; however, there is a still a lot of work to do before Milwaukee can claim that it is a fashion hub.

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Especially for the gentlemen: What to wear on a first date

Posted on 09 October 2008 by Nick Roberts

A couple of days ago, when I was talking with several of my friends about the topic, they had informed me that people do not really go on dates anymore, which I am kind of sad about; so guys, we should bring dating back. When we do bring dating back, what are gentlemen to wear? This can be a daunting task! I remember last year, several of my residents came up to me and asked me the question, “What should I wear?” Well in deciding what to wear for the date, a gentleman should dress for what the occasion calls for. With that in mind, I came up with three looks, which can be applied to the majority of dating scenarios that college students go on.

Casual—Polo, jeans and sneakers: This look is probably the most commonly used and easiest outfit in the male college student’s repertoire, but it can also be done wrong. To start with, make sure the polo fits well. I see lots of guys whose polos are too big and could probably go down a size. The polo’s sleeve should end at the mid-part of your bicep, and not all the way down to your elbow. The fit should touch your body from your shoulders to waist without binding. The jeans should be fully intact, no holes or paint marks or whatever else Abercrombie throws on them, and preferably straight leg. Your sneakers should be clean, not beat up, and if were to suggest a pair, they would be a pair of white Chuck Taylor’s. That shoe goes with just about anything.

Nice Dinner—White button down dress shirt, dark jeans and dress shoes: Every gentleman at this age should own a white dress shirt, and you can get a lot more mileage out of it then just wearing it to church/wedding/job interview. For the fit of the shirt, the tail of the shirt should be long enough to lay under your rear end, but not too long if you choose to wear it untucked. The cuff of your shirt should fall in the crook between the base of your thumb and wrist. The buttons should lie flat when buttoned and the fabric should not bunch. If you have a slimmer frame, go for shirts that are usually labeled modern or slim flit, or if you are on the larger side, look for shirts that have box pleats on the back of the shirt. This allows you more room but without the excess fabric. If the weather is getting cooler as it is now, wear a v-neck sweater if you have one, preferably in grey. As for the jeans, again straight leg is the way to go, with no holes and other markings, and keep the denim dark, which is a little dressier. Lastly, as for the dress shoes, black or brown is up to you, just be sure to match your belt with it, and please no white athletic socks.

Swanky Dinner/Bar or Special Evening—Sport coat, dress shirt and dark denim: This look is if you are going some place fancy but a suit is not required, or this look could be substituted for a suit. For those men who have a suit and normally only wear the jacket with the pants, this is a way to get more use of out your jacket. By wearing the jacket with a dark denim jean you still can achieve that formal effect, but without the uncomfortable feeling that some gentlemen have when it comes to wearing a suit. To finish the look, pair it with a pair of dress shoes or even a pair of sneakers, but like I said before, make sure they are in great condition. Add a pocket square if you wish to add a little more flavor to the ensemble. There is a great video online at men.style.com that will show you step by step how to do this, or just check out my blog, where I will post the video.

So there are three fail-safe looks when going out on a date. These are just some guidelines; so don’t feel obligated to do exactly what I wrote about. The great thing about fashion is that you can make it your own, so experiment a little and come up with a look that feels good for you. As Tim Gunn from Project Runway says, “Make it work!”

Please visit my newly created blog Make it Work Milwaukee. On my blog, I will post pictures of people who I think display an individual and creative sense of style which visitors can comment on, as well as my articles from The Warrior and any additional topics that I feel like writing about.

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Falling in Love with Cyrano de Bergerac

Posted on 10 October 2007 by Kristyn Juza

After a symphony of groans in both sections of Dr. Mary Beth Tallon’s English 43 class, it was official: students are not thrilled to see a required play. No one seemed to be excited about sitting at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater for two hours and 56 minutes on Tuesday for the production of Cyrano de Bergerac, a play about an ugly man named Cyrano whom no woman could ever love. “I always request that students attend plays as part of my classes,” Tallon said, “It’s essential to see the literature staged as it was meant to be and to judge it in that light. I chose Cyrano because it is a great classic of the theater and is not to be missed.”

Cyrano de Bergerac is a play written in the late 1890s by Edmond Rostand. Cyrano is a poet and swordsman, but his ugliness does not stop him from falling in love with Roxanne, the most beautiful woman he knows. As it is a tragedy, she does not return his love, but fosters love for a beautiful man, Christian. Roxanne loves poetry and beauty, and since neither man has both, they work together to woo the woman of their dreams.

They go through a series of meetings with Roxanne where Cyrano feeds Christian poetry to speak to Roxanne, and all the while she thinks that Christian is the perfect man. There is an entire scene in which Roxanne is standing on her balcony and Cyrano begins feeding Christian his poetry. It becomes too difficult so Cyrano takes over speaking to Roxanne, and because it is so dark, she thinks it is Christian and decides to kiss him.

Not only are Christian and Cyrano vying for Roxanne’s love, she has also caught the eye of the rich Comte de Guiche. After Christian’s speech to Roxanne, she breaks Cyrano’s heart and asks him to distract de Guiche while she and Christian get married. De Guiche finds out and sends Christian and

Cyrano to the front lines of France’s war with Spain. Roxanne asks that Christian write his words of love to her every day and Cyrano agrees. The ending is a bizarre twist of fate that only those who see it will know about.

“I hope and believe that they [the students] really like the action and fall in love with the great hero, Cyrano,” said Tallon. The students felt differently. Their heads were filled with both high and low expectations.

Ashley Tomaier, a sophomore in the college of Health Sciences, said, “I didn’t expect it to be good at all.” Pete Lindley, a sophomore in the college of Business, said, “I had pretty high expectations after seeing the Cyrano episode of Wishbone.”

However, to the surprise of most, Cyrano was a hit. Everyone was eating it up, but for many different reasons. The humor of the play came as a surprise to Maggie Homer, a sophomore in the college of Health Sciences, who said that it was nothing like what she had expected from a tragedy.

Emma Cotter, a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences, thought its message was particularly relevant to college life.

“I liked how the topics were relatable to us,” said Cotter. “Using topics like jealousy, self-consciousness and romance is a great way to cater to college students.”

The actors made it easy for the audience to fall in love with the characters. Kara Foster, a sophomore in the college of Arts and Sciences, said, “The actors brought a lot of dimensions to the characters.”

“I was pretty impressed,” said Sulaiman Al-Saeed, a sophomore in the college of Business. Al-Saeed said the actors used the space very well for such a small stage.

But one of its highest selling points was simply the fact that it was a French play. Kelsey McCusker, a sophomore in the college of Communication, said, “It’s a very ‘French Pride’ sort of play and I love that.”

The play ended with a death, a discovery, a hero and a standing ovation. All and all, for most, this play turned out to be a good use of two hours and 56 minutes on a Tuesday night.

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