Archive | From the Editor

March Letter from the Editor

Posted on 28 March 2012 by Adam Ryback

Thank you for picking up another copy of The Warrior! This issue we highlighted the presidential and vice-presidential elections for Marquette University Student Government.

It is a shame that none of the candidates have considered any cost-cutting measures to lower the cost of tuition. One has to wonder whether MUSG represents us or the administration. However, the bigger question is whether the administration takes their recommendations seriously. In the past the administration has approached MUSG to pass recommendations they support, such as changing the default settings on university printing machines to be double-sided.

Although I was thankful after this change was made several years ago, it made me think about what MUSG actually does for us. If they can only pass legislation which the university already supports, why not cut out the middleman? Hopefully our newly elected officials will be able to assert themselves and properly represent the students.

Disregarding my opinions on the organization itself, I believe that it is important for The Warrior to recognize Joey Ciccone and Trent Carlson, the outgoing president and vice-president. Both are tireless workers who truly care about their constituents. Whenever I needed information on the events in student government, they were more than helpful at providing it. The level of access and care provided to the students is truly worthy of respect. I wish them the best in all of their future endeavors.

Please enjoy the issue! If you have any comments or concerns, please e-mail me at [email protected] If you wish to join the paper, please sign up at thewarrior.org/join.

Thank you and have a blessed Lent.

Adam Ryback
Editor, 2011-12

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Letter from the editor

Posted on 28 October 2010 by WarriorAdmin

Thanks for picking up another copy of The Warrior! We hope you enjoyed our last issue featuring Fr. John Naus, SJ. Photography editor Mike Szatkowski did a phenomenal job covering the story and designing the centerspread. We can’t wait for him to do another!

But after three issues with a Catholic priest on the cover, we thought it might be a good idea to switch it up. Not that we don’t enjoy being a Catholic newspaper, we just don’t want to beat you over the head with it.

So with Halloween around the corner and with our newfound imperative to not have an ecclesiastical cover page, we settled upon covering all the ghost stories being rumored around Marquette.

Whether you’re in Johnston or Humphrey, you’ll be doing a double-take after every unusual noise thanks to this rather frightening article courtesy of Melanie Pawlyszyn.

But the end of October doesn’t only mean Halloween is coming up. We also have the November elections on the 2nd of the month.

Wade Balkonis took this opportunity to write on the Tea Party movement for what is his first article of the semester. Stephanie Marecki has written an exquisite article explaining why she thinks you should vote for Scott Walker in this election.

Even if you don’t agree with one of our writers, be sure to get out and vote this election to ensure that our country and our state are better places for years to come.

And once you get tired of all our serious topics, take a stroll down to the Arts and Entertainment section where you can read Gus Lopez’s fashion suggestions. And if that doesn’t suit you, check out our Dear Lita column, where Lita answers all of your questions. Don’t be afraid to write about your worries either!

Finally, the Warrior staff would like to say how happy it is that its webmaster, Stephanie Silman, is back on campus. We all pray that you have a speedy recovery, Stephanie. Get well soon!

by Adam Ryback

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Welcome class of 2014

Posted on 31 August 2010 by Adam Ryback

Welcome to Marquette!

I hope you enjoy your first edition of The Warrior. We are an independent news source on campus, founded in memory of our school’s old nickname and mascot. We are devoted to delivering our campus news which is fair and uncensored.

In the early 1990s, Marquette changed its nickname from “Warriors” to “Golden Eagles.” It was the opinion of intellectual elites that Native American nicknames were offensive and derogatory.

Despite an ESPN poll taken which showed that the vast majority of Native Americans think the exact opposite and the fact that Native Americans have fought to keep these “offensive” nicknames, the university clearly knew what was best for them.

School nicknames are chosen because of some quality the school would like its athletes to emulate, such as strength or bravery. That is why a former Milwaukee baseball team was called the “Braves,” and also given a Native American logo.

So, like us, many students and alumni were unwilling to buy the university’s story. Pride in the old nickname resurfaced six years ago when the university commissioned a study on the athletic nickname. For about a year, Marquette administrators considered returning to the Warrior nickname, and conducted numerous focus groups, studies and surveys regarding the school’s moniker.      

But in the end, decided to change the Golden Eagles’ nickname to “Gold.”

A storm of protest resulted, so the university reverted to Golden Eagles.

Throughout the whole ordeal the university refused to even suffer votes supporting the Warrior name, ignoring popular opinion. Even though the nickname did not return, the spirit behind the movement stayed. The students still make a point of chanting “Let’s go, Warriors!” at the start of every game.

But the story does not end with the chants at the Bradley Center. A group of intelligent, hard-working students decided to speak up for what they believed in and refused to be censored by the university for voicing their opinion. And what better way to do that than with a student-run newspaper, independent of the university?

This year we plan on keeping their legacy alive, and we hope to keep it going for many more.

We have a great line-up of stories for freshmen in this special edition of The Warrior. We are kicking off a new feature in The Warrior called “Office Hours” – in which a professor gives an opinion about an issue they feel passionate about– with a piece by Dr. John McAdams, an Associate Professor in the Political Science Department.

We have also detailed various activities freshmen can do on and off-campus. Within this issue, we feature different restaurants you’ll want to check out in Downtown Milwaukee. And for those without cars, don’t lose your bus pass! Otherwise, a night on the town may be more expensive than you wish.

Be sure to check out your introduction to sports at Marquette. And whatever you do, don’t forget to see the reasons why we’re better than our arch-rival, the University of Wisconsin – Madison. I know! It’s a no-brainer. But we just thought we should remind you.

We hope this special edition of The Warrior finds you well. These next four years just may be some of the best years of your life. Never waste a single day here. You’ll find out all too quickly that you’ll wish you could have had a few of them back. Enjoy your first semester!

by Adam Ryback

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It’s what Marquette didn’t hand me that taught me the most

Posted on 28 April 2010 by Katelyn Ferral

Caring about something is hard work. A lot of hard work. If it’s one thing I’ve learned and grown to appreciate during my time at Marquette and my tenure at The Warrior, it’s that dedication, in any remarkable sense of the word, exists only because of people who care—care enough to take the criticism, care enough to keep going when everything goes wrong, and care enough about a mission to see it realized.

If hard work is needed for caring,courage is equally necessary. It takes a certain amount of courage to care. Maybe not Joan-of-Arccourage, maybe not Little-Rock- Nine-courage, but it takes some sense of bravery to put one’s name on a project or endeavor and take responsibility for it.

This virtue—the importance of caring and the value it creates in the midst of challenge—is indispensable. It is by far the most significant virtue I’ve learned at Marquette. Whether it’s caring about journalism, social justice, engineering, healthcare or finance, the existence of people who are caring and passionate is essential.

The Warrior is disliked and delegitimized by many. It is often excluded from serious discussion and consideration at Marquette—and that, in my opinion, is a shame and a disappointment. Obviously, I’m biased. I’m biased because clearly I care—I care a hell of a lot. But despite my personal investment in this broadsheet and the organization behind it, I believe The Warrior represents more than any type of ideological view, or renegade news source—it represents a student dedication to a free, truly uncensored, and financially independent forum for student voices. It the demonstration of students’ caring. It is the personification of a commitment to holding our administration accountable, celebrating meritocracy—all with the aim of projecting a vision of a great Marquette. The university doesn’t control us, can’t monitor us, can’t regulate us, and it drives them nuts. We are not an Office of Student Development-sanctioned student organization; we are not beholden to Marquette. We cherish our independence, but we want to be a part of the discussion. We shouldn’t have to be dependent in order to be invited to take part.

With this last issue, I depart from The Warrior. I still have some time to burn up the dance floor at Murphy’s (thank God), but my collegiate journalism career has come to an end. I think my work on this paper speaks for itself, and I hope that in some way, I have encouraged someone to care, because often, that’s all we have to offer, and incidentally, that’s all that really matters.


“One person can make a difference, and everybody should try.”-JFK

The Warrior Editor-in-chief Katelyn Ferral does righteous fist pump, releasing her inner Warrior and celebrating the triumphant completion of her reign. She was not on “performance enhancers” at the time of this photo.  (Photo by Matt Dixon)

The Warrior Editor-in-chief Katelyn Ferral does righteous fist pump, releasing her inner Warrior and celebrating the triumphant completion of her reign. She was not on “performance enhancers” at the time of this photo. (Photo by Matt Dixon)

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Lay off the double standard, Marquette

Posted on 18 November 2009 by Katelyn Ferral

This issue of The Warrior is filled with something for everyone. We have a piece on the MUSG Student Organization Allocation Committee, an investigation on religious freedom and proselytism on campus, a winter sports preview and even a wedding announcement.
The Warrior continues to exist through the support of the Marquette student body, our advertisers and a dedicated group of staff writers, editors and business managers, all who work hard to deliver a real student voice in campus journalism and a fair, investigative look at campus issues that would otherwise go unreported. Our paper receives a diverse range of responses from readers: some hate us, some love us, and some are indifferent, but the response I find most appalling is the one we so often get from Marquette’s own administrators, faculty and staff. Although there are those who do support our efforts and have been very helpful, we continue to be routinely stonewalled by certain departments on campus for either no reason at all or for bureaucratic desires to protect and shield the University from a critical eye.
The pushback from Marquette has occurred since our founding in 2005, but this issue’s center spread provides a clear example of what continues to occur when our reporters ask for comment.
In this issue’s feature, comment was requested from Campus Ministry regarding their role in the formation and implementation of the University Religious Activities Policy. I received no response from most people I contacted in that department, but one staff member e-mailed me and refused to comment because of the paper’s continued embrace of the name “The Warrior”, which he said reflected an “unfortunate part of our Marquette history.”
If Marquette exists, as we so often hear, to not only educate students but facilitate debate and the exchange of ideas on campus, why are some at Marquette so reluctant to provide comment to a completely student-run paper like The Warrior seeking to do just that? The Warrior exists to support the free exchange and discussion of ideas on campus, and we welcome a robust debate regardless of one’s background, ideology or views. Don’t agree with an article we’ve published? Write in, contribute! Want another side represented or have an idea for a story or an issue to be investigated? Let us know and we’ll do our best to find the answers for you.
As a proud Marquette student, it is truly disheartening to see such a closed-minded and unwelcoming attitude from so many in the administration and various departments across campus. I would hope University administrators, faculty and staff would be proud to see Marquette students dedicated to the pursuit of truth in print with no strings attached, no subsidies from the College of Communication, and no oversight from a faculty member; just students, caring enough to face the challenges of working on an independent paper and dedicated enough to stand outside in wind, rain and snow to pass our product out.
But unfortunately that hope has yet to be realized.

This issue of The Warrior is filled with something for everyone. We have a piece on the MUSG Student Organization Allocation Committee, an investigation on religious freedom and proselytism on campus, a winter sports preview and even a wedding announcement.

The Warrior continues to exist through the support of the Marquette student body, our advertisers and a dedicated group of staff writers, editors and business managers, all who work hard to deliver a real student voice in campus journalism and a fair, investigative look at campus issues that would otherwise go unreported. Our paper receives a diverse range of responses from readers: some hate us, some love us, and some are indifferent, but the response I find most appalling is the one we so often get from Marquette’s own administrators, faculty and staff. Although there are those who do support our efforts and have been very helpful, we continue to be routinely stonewalled by certain departments on campus for either no reason at all or for bureaucratic desires to protect and shield the University from a critical eye.

The pushback from Marquette has occurred since our founding in 2005, but this issue’s center spread provides a clear example of what continues to occur when our reporters ask for comment.

In this issue’s feature, comment was requested from Campus Ministry regarding their role in the formation and implementation of the University Religious Activities Policy. I received no response from most people I contacted in that department, but one staff member e-mailed me and refused to comment because of the paper’s continued embrace of the name “The Warrior”, which he said reflected an “unfortunate part of our Marquette history.”

If Marquette exists, as we so often hear, to not only educate students but facilitate debate and the exchange of ideas on campus, why are some at Marquette so reluctant to provide comment to a completely student-run paper like The Warrior seeking to do just that? The Warrior exists to support the free exchange and discussion of ideas on campus, and we welcome a robust debate regardless of one’s background, ideology or views. Don’t agree with an article we’ve published? Write in, contribute! Want another side represented or have an idea for a story or an issue to be investigated? Let us know and we’ll do our best to find the answers for you.

As a proud Marquette student, it is truly disheartening to see such a closed-minded and unwelcoming attitude from so many in the administration and various departments across campus. I would hope University administrators, faculty and staff would be proud to see Marquette students dedicated to the pursuit of truth in print with no strings attached, no subsidies from the College of Communication, and no oversight from a faculty member; just students, caring enough to face the challenges of working on an independent paper and dedicated enough to stand outside in wind, rain and snow to pass our product out.

But unfortunately that hope has yet to be realized.

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Farewell Archbishop Dolan

Posted on 31 March 2009 by Remington Tonar

Although Archbishop Timothy Dolan has only been the pastor of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee since 2002, in that time he has had a tremendous impact on Catholics and non-Catholics alike throughout the greater Milwaukee community. For those who have not had the privilege of meeting Archbishop Dolan, the following comments on his demeanor and his accomplishments will not do him justice.

Archbishop Dolan came to Milwaukee after demoralizing revelations about former Milwaukee Archbishop Rembert Weakland’s inappropriate sexual activity and efforts to keep his actions secret. In the midst of this scandal, Dolan brought a boisterous Irish personality to the Archdiocese, full of energy and orthodoxy. However, far from raising his crosier (the staff that the bishop holds) against those who would dissent from Catholic orthodoxy, Dolan employed his personable and persuasive character to effect change.

Aside from being pastoral, Dolan also has proven to be a capable administrator, for which his experience as the rector at the Pontifical North American College prepared him. It definitely has not been easy, especially considering the recent financial burdens of the Archdiocese due to sexual abuse settlements. Just last year, Dolan managed to escape a multi-million dollar deficit by consolidating Archdiocesan offices and staff. In addition, his presence and candor have allowed him to successfully navigate the secular media, making him well liked by many.

While New York is certainly a larger and more diverse Catholic community than Milwaukee, Dolan will surely leave a positive impact out East, just as he has done here in the Midwest. His staunch opposition to abortion and his adherence to Catholic orthodoxy are essential for such a prominent and visible position such as the Archdiocese of New York. Of course, as he has done in Milwaukee, Dolan will undoubtedly express these positions gently and with understanding.

Archbishop Dolan has raised the level of religious morale in Milwaukee. His larger than life personality and perennially happy demeanor are magnetic, and his uncanny ability to remember names helps him build a strong relationship with Catholics in his flock. Milwaukee will miss Dolan’s style and personality, which has captivated many and renewed Catholic spirituality here in the Archdiocese of Milwaukee.

As his Excellency makes this transition to what is arguably the most visible diocese in the nation, there is little doubt in this writer’s mind that he will be welcomed and successful.
Thank you Archbishop Dolan for your leadership and inspiration in the short time you’ve been with us. You will be greatly missed.

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Letter from the editor

Posted on 24 September 2008 by Remington Tonar

Thanks for logging on to TheWarrior.org the website of Marquette’s independent news source. Our cover story for this issue is about an awesome program that the University has, which allows older alumni to return to their Alma Mater and audit classes, helping them be the difference at every stage in their life. This program is a perfect example of how Marquette strives to offer the best for students and the community, and as such we should attempt to return the favor by always behaving in a manner that reflects the great school that we attend. On campus, or off, students need to be more conscious of their behavior, especially when intoxicated.

Also in this issue is a great point-counterpoint editorial on the recent government bailout of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, a debate that anyone concerned about the unstable economy should find relevant. If you don’t know much about the nuances of this crisis, you may also want to take a look at the Finance column in the News section, where Jacob Jasperson provides some tips on how you can help keep the economy stable.

Regular readers will notice a significant change in the News section this week. Joseph Schuster, formerly The Warrior’s MUSG reporter, will no longer be writing for us in that capacity. Mr. Schuster was recently appointed to MUSG, and as such Molly Petitjean will be replacing him on the MUSG beat. On that same note, I would like to thank everyone who submitted letters to the editor in response to Joseph’s article in the previous edition of The Warrior. It is heartening to see the level of dialogue that Joseph’s articles have created, as it is this type of discourse that ultimately makes us more informed and aware students.

In addition, I would like to draw your attention to Cathleen Bury’s article on John Tefft, the United States’ ambassador to Georgia, who is a Marquette University alumnus. Cathleen was in contact with the ambassador’s office, and had scheduled an interview, which unfortunately had to be cancelled due to an emergency meeting between the ambassador and NATO representatives. The article is still very informative and definitely worth reading.

Tom Klind joins us in this issue as our Religious beat reporter and Catholic columnist. In this edition, Mr. Klind reviews and responds to the latest book by controversial professor, Dr. Daniel Maguire, who was reprimanded last year by Milwaukee Archbishop Timothy Dolan for publishing teachings contrary to established Catholic doctrine.

On a personal note, I would like to recognize Dr. Chris Miller, the new Vice President for Student Affairs, for his outstanding work at Marquette thus far. His predecessor, Father Andy Thon, was well respected and left big shoes to fill, and I am glad to see that the University hired a man capable of filling them.

Once again, thanks for visiting TheWarrior.org!

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Welcome Freshmen!

Posted on 21 August 2008 by Remington Tonar

Finally. You’ve arrived. You have undoubtedly looked forward to this week with great anticipation and anxiety, and I want to take this opportunity to welcome you to the Marquette family.

The next four years – or five for those of you who will choose to stay a little longer – have the potential to be some of the most memorable of your life, and surely will challenge and impact you immensely. In addition to offering a notable academic program, Marquette offers its students many opportunities outside the classroom, and I encourage you to take full advantage of all that this school, and this city, has to offer. Get involved in student organizations, Greek life, intramural sports, volunteer work, Campus Ministry and the vibrant social life that binds this community together.

Tell your parents not to worry about you; you are going to be just fine here. The friends you make will help support you and you will surely help support them through this first year of your college journey. To help you adjust to that experience, The Warrior, Marquette’s independent student run newspaper, has published this issue. In this edition you will find an overview of some of the things you should know as you begin this year. We hope that you find the information we have collected useful and will continue to pick up a copy of The Warrior throughout the school year.

Thanks for reading, and I hope that the coming year is full of new and exciting opportunities and experiences. Welcome home.

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I’m out

Posted on 30 April 2008 by Robert Fafinski

This is my last editor’s column for The Warrior. Working for The Warrior as a writer, columnist and now, editor will probably be the thing I remember most about my time at Marquette. To see how far we’ve come as a paper is a phenomenal testament to the dedication of our many staff members over the years. I’m excited to see what avenues The Warrior will pursue in my absence.

In this issue, we have a great account of Pope Benedict XVI’s recent trip to New York City by Remington Tonar. When we realized that we had the opportunity to send Remington to the N-Y-C, it was a no-brainer. So, check that piece out… it’s the centerspread.

Katelyn Ferral wrote two good articles: One an interesting piece about Marquette’s treatment of Joseph McCarthy, who I would consider to be the most influential Marquette alumnus, historically speaking. And the other, she writes about her one-on-one, exclusive interview with former Attorney General during the Reagan years, Edwin Meese III. Also in news, Daniel Suhr has a wonderful tribute piece to Dr. Wolfe who’s teaching his last class session at Marquette today.

Adam Covach headed up a collaboration in an effort to decide what MUSG should do with its ever-expanding reserve fund. A joke amongst my friends is that some of the senators in MUSG said they would actually raise the activity fee if given the chance despite the fact that we don’t even use all the money as is. Thus, MUSG has a pool of unused money. Luckily for everyone, MUSG has decided to invest in an electronic LIMO, instead of buying us something we truly want like a country music act or some new squat racks in the rec center. Joseph Schuster also writes about the MUSG Senate in this issue. And his piece seems satirical and borders on funny until you realize it’s all true; then it’s just sad.

America’s post-secondary education system has largely turned into a liberal breeding-ground of intolerance, secularism and morally relativistic mushiness. And, to some degree, Marquette has fallen into this trap. But, for the student who truly desires an education oriented towards truth and discernment, there are professors on this campus who can help. At the risk of hurting their reputations amongst their liberal colleagues, here’s the list… Oh, and one more theme: they all tend to be very demanding.

The Rev. Steven Avella in the History department makes history come alive by telling it as a story. He frames most of American history as a continuation of the Hamiltonianism-Jeffersonianism battles that were so instrumental in the formation of our nation. He genuinely cares about his students, frequently talking with them outside of class.

Michael Donoghue, Ph.D., teaches using a give-and-take method with his students and assigns applicable books, which consequently results in a better understanding of the Carribean history and culture.

Darrell Dobbs, Ph.D., is perceived by many as intimidating, but I suspect that’s due to Dobbs’ lack of patience for those who do not prepare for class. Anyone who assigns C.S. Lewis’ “The Abolition of Man” is good to go in my book. Plus he has instilled a love of political philosophy in many students that gets brought out more in subsequent classes with Ryan Hanley, Ph.D., to whom I’ll always owe credit to for any defense of Adam Smith or capitalism I engage in.

John McAdams, Ph.D. has always been a personal mentor for me, helping me remember to never be afraid to take someone on, intellectually speaking, if I think correctly. And obviously, Dr. Christopher Wolfe, Ph.D., who has been a friend, mentor and teacher.

And finally, I think I speak for every student who ever took a classes with the Rev. Phillip Renczes, S.J., when I say to Marquette: Hire the man. His class on Joseph Ratzinger was amazing – he taught us well and remained faithful to the Cathechism. Fr. Joseph Mueller, S.J., was another great lecturer who has a knack for getting results from his students.

Almost all of these professors have a few things in common: I’ve seen most of them out having a beer or two with students; they see their students as people they need to mentor, not just teach. They are all tougher professors in terms of expectations. And they all encourage and demand classroom participation.

Also, on the Wednesday evening edition of Wheel of Fortune, my friend Sabrina Stephensen, a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences will represent Marquette during the show’s College Week. Without being blatant about the results, let’s just say there are 20,000 reasons to watch Sabrina compete for Marquette.

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Letter From the Editor

Posted on 16 April 2008 by Robert Fafinski

As you may have noticed, inside this 16-page issue of The Warrior is a 12-page advertisement from Pro-Life Wisconsin. Much of The Warrior staff is Catholic. Most of the people who read The Warrior are Catholic. Marquette is, allegedly, Catholic. So the fact that we decided to put this advertisement in shouldn’t be news at all, but it is. And here’s why:

The Marquette Tribune, which receives funding from Marquette University and serves as its sanctioned paper, has twice refused to run pro-life, anti-abortion advertisements this semester. First, it rejected an ad geared towards spring breakers, “Be good to yourself over spring break,” the ad continued, “Make smart choices the night before…that way you won’t have any emergencies to deal with the morning after! ‘Emergency contraception’ is a powerful, high dose of steroids that tricks your body into thinking it is pregnant. These steroids can cause chemical abortions and deadly blood clots” (emphasis in original).

Then — and this is where The Warrior comes in — the Tribune rejected the 12-page insert you see in this issue of The Warrior.

So, in order for Pro-Life Wisconsin to get its message out on a Catholic campus, the group had to come to The Warrior, a paper that is not allowed to be distributed in campus buildings or on campus property. That’s why we have to hand-distribute The Warrior on public property outside of Raynor and Cudahy. To get out a Catholic message on a Catholic campus, they had to come to a paper that accepts no money from Marquette.

It had to come to The Warrior. At a moment like this, you can’t help but say it… We are (Embarrassed for you), Marquette!

In the past, administrators and professors have called The Warrior an “underground” or “rogue” paper. Whatever… The day that a Pro-life group is forced to come to an “underground” or “extreme” paper at a Catholic university, it’s a sad day for Marquette, intellectual honesty and Catholicism as a whole.

As our Business Manager, Katie Wycklendt, said when asked about our decision to run the ad: “The question isn’t why we would run it… The question is why wouldn’t we. One of [The Warrior’s] nine goals is to ‘Cherish Marquette’s Catholic Identity’ and in this instance we have the opportunity to do so while providing students with a very informative and moving piece of literature.”

Kudos, Katie, couldn’t have said it better myself. All these administrators, Jesuits and professors, so caught up in the culture of intolerance towards truth and consequence, refuse to fight for some Catholic principles they so obviously disagree with. But to all you level-headed observers out there, have no fear. Marquette does not simply belong to these liberal “adults.” It has students who understand right from wrong, who recognize foolish arguments and who will always fight to keep Marquette truly Catholic — true to the Pope and Catechism.

And if us running this advertisement changes one woman’s mind about killing her offspring, I say it’s all worth it.

Late Breaking News: According to Warrior reporter Remington Tonar, the Marquette Tribune will be running a full-page pro-life ad on Thursday that will highlight the fact that babies feel pain during abortions.

Assuming this is, indeed, the case, congratulations. I still wonder why it took three tries to put a pro-life ad in a school newspaper at a Catholic school. I’d be willing to guess that enough people with common sense were disgusted and complained that they had to run it.

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