Archive | Soccer

MU women’s soccer: The path of success

Posted on 08 December 2010 by WarriorAdmin

When people think of Marquette University sports, many times their thoughts go straight to basketball, but this year, the women’s soccer team, with the help of its seniors, proved that they too deserve recognition.

The soccer team made it through the season with an 11-0-0 record in conference play and a 16-5-3 overall record. They advanced to the NCAA tournament where they made it to the third round for the second time in Marquette history.

This record would not have been possible without the help of some great players and strong leaders. Some of these leaders are seniors Ashley Bares (forward), and Rosie Malone-Povolny (midfielder).

“I think being a senior is a different experience because you are the oldest on the team,” Bares said in an email. “Therefore, you are the one that has the experience and are setting the example for your younger teammates and what you expect from each other.”

Bares, 21, from Belgium, Wis. said she chose to play soccer at Marquette because of the “great atmosphere,” and the “family” feel that the team has.

“I think it was a lot of fun this year and a special year for us,” Bares said.

“Knowing that it was my senior year, I think, also felt different,” she continued. “I wanted to take in each game and not take anything for granted, take in the moments and what we accomplished, being 11-0 was a great accomplishment, and going to the Sweet 16.”

Malone-Povolny, 21, from St. Paul, Minn. echoed Bares’ sentiments.

“I think this year what made our team special was our determination to play beautiful soccer, and the best soccer we could,” Malone-Povolny wrote. “We had this determination because we cared for each other on and off the field.”

Both Bares and Malone-Povolny have played soccer at Marquette for four years. This year, according to The Marquette Tribune, they each earned recognition. Bares earned “All-Big East First Team honors for her contribution to Marquette’s attack that ranked second in conference games in points (80), goals (26) and goals per game (2.26).”

Malone-Povolny was “named to the All-Big East Third Team after starting all 23 matches and tallying 11 points on the season.”

“For me I think it was a great year because I had nothing holding me back,” Bares said. “I was fully healthy and didn’t struggle with any injuries so that allowed me to play how I can.”

In her years as a Marquette soccer player, Bares has struggled with several injuries including compartment syndrome surgery her sophomore year and a broken/dislocated wrist her junior year.

Commenting on her good health, Bares said, “This year I could help my team and fulfill my role as a forward to work and score some goals.”

“Making it to the Sweet 16 was great because it was the first time since I’ve been on the team that we made it that far, so that was neat to experience and take it to the third round of the NCAA tourney,” Bares said.

As seniors, Bares and Malone-Povolny said they felt they had additional responsibilities.

“I think being good examples every day at practice and in games was one of our main goals as seniors,” Malone-Povolny said. “What any team hopes from their seniors is that they lead through their actions and through their awareness of how to build a healthy and caring team. Having that kind of awareness was an important difference this year.”

Although women’s soccer had a season worthy of praise, the girls are also expected to focus on their academics. When asked about how she juggles school and soccer each girl said she was able to use elements from soccer to assist in her studies.

Malone-Povolny took her attitude for soccer and applied it to her academics.

“Both soccer and school are a challenge that require the same mentality for success.” Malone-Povolny said.

“The work ethic and the discipline that is fostered in sports translate smoothly into the academic setting,” she continued. “Just like pushing yourself to finish that last sprint, so too can you push yourself to finish those last ten pages or to write that last paragraph.”

Bares’ teammates supported her in her studies.

“Balancing soccer and studies at first was overwhelming and new to me,” Bares said. “But once you learn how to manage your time and when to get things done, it helps a lot and you can get things done. Using tutors, and even teammates also helped me get my studies done.”

“Being a senior, I think you do have more responsibilities,” Bares said. “I think that comes with experience and learning from previous years. We want to help teach our ‘sisters’ how things are done, and what goals we want to reach, on the field and off.”

Reflecting back on soccer at Marquette, each player felt she had a positive experience.

“Soccer at MU has been a dream for me,” Bares said. “Been fortunate to love my college experience with my team, I’ve met so many great girls and people. It has been a privilege to play for MU and with my teammates. I’ll always have a ‘family’ at MU.”

“I have learned the importance of a challenge and how much that challenge can help you grow into a stronger person,” Malone-Povolny said.

“I have learned how important it is to have great teammates who pick you up when you think you cannot do more,” she continued. “I have learned how important it is to love what you do and to constantly seek to improve on all aspects of that passion.”

by Sara K. Torres
[email protected]

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Navy dominates in annual Tri-ROTC football game

Posted on 18 November 2009 by Bradley Wilson

Navy dominates in annual Tri-ROTC football game
Bradley Wilson
When most people think of football on Sunday, they think of professional teams grinding it out on the gridiron. However, on the eighth of November, an annual tradition was continued at Valley Fields that many students may not be aware of. For the past several decades, the men and women of Marquette’s Army, Navy, and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps have gathered to play several games of flag football against one another.
Despite being played in front of a small audience of ROTC instructors and students, these games carry the weight of bragging rights for the winning teams for an entire year. “The games mean a lot because they are a means to compete against our counterparts in a less formal environment, pomp and circumstance aside.” said the Navy ROTC team captain Cletus Ketter.
“Competitions are displayed on a much larger scale on national television between West Point and Annapolis. However, it means just much to the ROTC cadets and midshipman who are itching to take the field and show the other branches who deserves to be the best man to man and in the need. In the end, we will be the same rank as the players on the Academy that are seen on television.”
What these matchups lack in hype and a big stage, they make up for in intensity and passion. All of the teams have very athletic competitors, who leave all of their emotions out on the field. The ROTC flag football games generally become tackle football and the refs do not stop the cadets and midshipmen from having their fun. Unlike the intramural games, pass rushers and blockers can use their hands and fumbles are live.
This year Navy dominated the competition. They secured wins over both Army and Air Force in the women’s and men’s games due in a large part to a strong interest from their freshman class. In fact both Navy teams did not give up a single offensive touchdown all afternoon. With these victories, Marquette’s Navy ROTC will be able to hold win back “the Jug” from Army. “The Jug” is just what it sounds like, a trophy jug which the winner gets to hold onto until the next time they lose. They were also able to win back “The Boot” (which is surprise, surprise a mounted boot) a trophy the Navy midshipmen have withheld from Air Force for the past several years.
Meanwhile, the female Army team was able to post a crushing shutout win over the female Air Force team while the male Air Force squad overcame a surging Army team. Each of the matchups featured all the exciting plays of any college or pro football games including option reads, diving catches, a pick six, ankle breaking cut backs, and even a shanked field goal. Okay, so maybe it is not the same level of talent, but it is just as exciting nonetheless. These events may feature the traditional competition between rival branches of the military, but in the end they are all in good fun because every competitor is really playing for the same team.

When most people think of football on Sunday, they think of professional teams grinding it out on the gridiron. However, on the eighth of November, an annual tradition was continued at Valley Fields that many students may not be aware of. For the past several decades, the men and women of Marquette’s Army, Navy, and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps have gathered to play several games of flag football against one another.

Despite being played in front of a small audience of ROTC instructors and students, these games carry the weight of bragging rights for the winning teams for an entire year. “The games mean a lot because they are a means to compete against our counterparts in a less formal environment, pomp and circumstance aside.” said the Navy ROTC team captain Cletus Ketter.

“Competitions are displayed on a much larger scale on national television between West Point and Annapolis. However, it means just much to the ROTC cadets and midshipman who are itching to take the field and show the other branches who deserves to be the best man to man and in the need. In the end, we will be the same rank as the players on the Academy that are seen on television.”

What these matchups lack in hype and a big stage, they make up for in intensity and passion. All of the teams have very athletic competitors, who leave all of their emotions out on the field. The ROTC flag football games generally become tackle football and the refs do not stop the cadets and midshipmen from having their fun. Unlike the intramural games, pass rushers and blockers can use their hands and fumbles are live.

This year Navy dominated the competition. They secured wins over both Army and Air Force in the women’s and men’s games due in a large part to a strong interest from their freshman class. In fact both Navy teams did not give up a single offensive touchdown all afternoon. With these victories, Marquette’s Navy ROTC will be able to hold win back “the Jug” from Army. “The Jug” is just what it sounds like, a trophy jug which the winner gets to hold onto until the next time they lose. They were also able to win back “The Boot” (which is surprise, surprise a mounted boot) a trophy the Navy midshipmen have withheld from Air Force for the past several years.

Meanwhile, the female Army team was able to post a crushing shutout win over the female Air Force team while the male Air Force squad overcame a surging Army team. Each of the matchups featured all the exciting plays of any college or pro football games including option reads, diving catches, a pick six, ankle breaking cut backs, and even a shanked field goal. Okay, so maybe it is not the same level of talent, but it is just as exciting nonetheless. These events may feature the traditional competition between rival branches of the military, but in the end they are all in good fun because every competitor is really playing for the same team.

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Semester review: Re-evaluating Marquette athletics’ performance in the fall season

Posted on 06 December 2006 by Nicole Larson

Fall season was satisfying overall for Marquette athletics, with three excellent teams that just kept getting better. 2006 proved a fruitful year for freshman recruits and also in the stunning leadership skills of the upperclassmen in their respective sports. Continue Reading

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Soccer team faces stiff competition from alums

Posted on 27 September 2006 by Nicole Larson

The Marquette soccer alums returned to Valley Fields last Thursday evening to take on the current Marquette men’s soccer team. The match proved that the alumni hadn’t lost a step as they were able to keep the current players at bay, playing them to a 1-1 tie. The exhibition match kicked off the Men’s Soccer Alumni Reunion.

The alumni used a very strong defense to blank the current men’s team in the first half, though it seemed that the current Marquette team started off unenthusiastically, underrating their former teammates. The current players seemed unorganized and slow to the ball. At the end of the first half, the score remained 0-0, but the alumni team had a mental advantage.

As the game progressed, the alumni team took the reins and began to play with some enthusiasm. The alumni team strung together many talented pass sequences when they had control of the ball, and the Golden Eagles could not seem to overcome their passing.

Thirty minutes into the second half, the alumni still hadn’t let a shot get through. In the 70th minute of play, however, the current Marquette men were able to score when Bryan Dahlquist placed the ball beautifully into the back of the net off of a corner kick from freshman Mike Plager.

The game took a turn for the better after the goal was scored for the current Marquette men, who found a spark of inspiration and began to play as a team.

The alumni team fought back from the one-goal disadvantage, and brought the game back to an even playing field in the 83rd minute when Derek Gutierrez, a four-time letter winner from 2000-2003, scored the second goal of the evening off a penalty kick. The score remained even for the remaining six minutes, and the game ended in a 1-1 tie. On Saturday, the men were blanked 1-0 by Providence. The match was a highly contested defensive struggle which the only score by Providence came in the 40th minute.

Marquette’s best chance came in the 77th minute off of a free kick, but they failed to capitalize. The Friar’s defensive style was able to limit Marquette’s chances to score. Marquette also saw a shot off of a free kick in the 55th minute, but it was saved by the Providence keeper.

Marquette fell to 1-8-1 overall and still remains winless in Big East competition. The team returns to action Sept. 27 at Notre Dame.

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110 minutes of soccer, wrapped up into three

Posted on 13 September 2006 by Luke Fuller

For the most recent Marquette women’s soccer game, a nationally televised match against St. Louis University, I wandered over to one of the places that televised the game, and recorded my thoughts as the game progressed. Going into the game Marquette was undefeated and ranked No. 17 by SoccerBuzz and St. Louis was 2-1-2 and ranked No. 27.

6:58 p.m. Arrive at Anodyne Coffee House,1208 E. Brady St., which was one of the eight or so local places I could find that carried Fox Soccer Network.

6:59 p.m. Somewhat disappointed, but not surprised, that this is not going to look like a scene out of a commercial during the World Cup with rowdy, shirtless, body-painted psychos. I’m still feeling pretty cool in my Team Italia soccer shirt though.

7:04 p.m. Introduction of team lineups for both the St. Louis University Billikens and Marquette Golden Eagles.

7:07 p.m. Ball drops/kickoff. I’m not really sure whether I should use the hockey or football term.

7:09 p.m. Announcer reads my mind and explains that the clock counts down from 45:00 rather than up from zero as in World Cup soccer or WIAA soccer.

7:12 p.m. SLU player down. I find out that the clock stops in college play, eliminating any chance for stoppage time. Hearing British announcers say “stoppage time” is about my favorite part of soccer.

7:27 p.m. SLU takes a 1-0 lead, thanks to Courtney Hulcer’s goal. Marquette is behind for the first time in the young season.

7:36 p.m. Hear the term “assist” used for about the 10,000 time in the broadcast. I begin to wonder if “dime” and “dish” are exclusively reserved for basketball.

7:46 p.m. Katie Kelly gets the better of Maureen Hughes in a serious collision.

7:55 p.m. Halftime; SLU outshot MU 11-0 in the first half.

8:11 p.m. Start of second half and in-game interview with Coach Roeders. MU looks much sharper initially.

8:13 p.m. MU gets a corner kick taken by Kelly.

8:13 p.m. GOOOOOAAAAALLLLLLLLLL by Lauren Weber.

8:27 p.m. As I finish my second Mountain Dew it occurs to me, what is a Billiken? (Turns out a Billiken is a version of an ancient Asian figure created by an art teacher in Kansas City, Mo., in 1908, and it became associated with SLU sometime between 1910 and 1911.)

8:57 p.m. End of regulation, meaning the last two times I have worn the Team Italia shirt the game I was watching went into OT (the World Cup Final was the other game).

9:01 p.m. Start of two 10:00 OT periods that will end in sudden death (or “sudden victory” or “golden gold” for those of you in the PC camp who believe using “sudden death” in sporting events is somehow contributing to America’s desensitization to violence.)

9:05 p.m. Laura Boyer makes a save for MU.

9:10 p.m. Great effort by Michelle Martin to keep the ball in play.

9:12 p.m. End of first OT.

9:15 p.m. Start of second OT.

9:16 p.m. Hear for the millionth time that SLU’s Alex Twellman comes from a long line of great soccer players. She is obviously the equivalent of John Lucas III, or Eli Manning.

9:25 p.m. Second OT ends. The game ends in 1-1 tie, making MU 2-0-2.

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