Tag Archive | "Club Sports"

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Marquette Club Football brings camaraderie, brotherhood to the field

Posted on 28 April 2010 by Joe Defelice

Many college students reminisce about their high school exploits on the sports field. An amazing catch in the outfield, a perfect jump shot to win the game, making the playoffs in the high school hockey league. But of all things, the most prominent memories are those made on the high school grid iron. Many of these experiences are left to faint recollection as students move on to college, where competition is fierce to earn a spot on the squad. Some universities don’t have varsity teams at all. However, there are those who find a place to play at their school, merely for the love of the game. It’s called club football, and for Sophomore Matthew Rainey it’s his way of continuing his high school passion. Far from all the pressures and politics of Division 1 athletics, right here at Marquette, a young group of students come together a few times a week and perfect their game, testing their mettle against their peers here. The goal? Saturday’s game.

mu footballFor Rainey, it’s all about the love of the game, “I like the camaraderie, and the chance to continue to play the sport I love. I didn’t think I’d get the chance to play football again after high school, I thought it was over. This gives me the chance to continue to play football, and that’s a great feeling.” “The great thing about football is that it’s really a team sport. When one person fails the team fails. If I look over and the guy next to me is struggling, I’m struggling too. You really learn to rely on each other and build that brotherhood.” The team doesn’t just stop at the field either. “We go hang out on the weekends, and everyone of us is a student here,” says Gorham. The best part for some is the relaxed atmosphere. Most players like that they only have to practice twice a week and still get the college experience, while playing football without all the politics.

So, who does our club team play? What’s the season like? The Golden Eagles start practice in August as the school year begins. They practice every day for about two to three weeks to develop cohesion and have a solid base to work from. This also helps knock off the dust and get everyone back in shape for the season. As the school year starts the team scales it back to two days a week to ensure that no one’s studies suffer. Game days vary between Saturday and Sunday depending on the match up that week. Generally when they play Division 3 schools the game is typically Saturday. For conference games against other club teams the games are usually on Sunday. The season spans eight games during the fall semester. The team battles other clubs like Miami Ohio, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, and SIU Edwardsville, as well as Division 3 teams like Concordia of Wisconsin and UW Parkside.

Marquette’s Club also plays a short spring season. “The spring is more or less for recruiting purposes and to dust off our game. We get out there and hit some people. It’s a chance to develop our offense with our new players and really a great time to have some fun,” Rainey says. This year the team will cap their spring season with a scrimmage against University of Wisconsin-Parkside.

With recent rumors circulating about the possibility of a D1 football team Gorham doesn’t seem worried that it will affect the club negatively. “The great part about club football is that it’s for the love of the game, the guys we play with now could have easily played on a D3 team no problem and maybe even on a D1 squad. We love football, and we chose to take on the academic challenge at Marquette. It would be cool to have a D1 team but I don’t think that it would detract from the club at all.”

So…where do I sign up? Marquette Club football maintains a web site at www.marquetteclubfootball.com. Here, interested students can find rosters, practice schedules and contact information for players and the officers of the club. If you have any questions about joining, dues, or anything else you can also send an email to   [email protected] and an officer will respond as quickly as possible. Even easier, show up to a practice and talk to one of the staff. Have a friend on the team…that works too. If you love football, then this is the place to play.

by Joe Defelice
joseph.defelice@mu[email protected]

Marquette Club Football Team (Photos courtesy of Marquette Football)

Marquette Club Football Team (Photos courtesy of Marquette Football)

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How arbitrary is MUSG’s allocation process? The Warrior goes beyond the paperwork

Posted on 18 November 2009 by Marissa Evans

How arbitrary is MUSG’s allocation process?
The Warrior goes beyond the paperwork
Marissa Evans
Throughout the year Marquette’s student government (MUSG) sits down to discuss Student Organization Allocation (SOA) for recognized and registered student organizations on campus. With over 250 organizations,, each one is unique in terms of how much funding it needs in order to have a successful event or year.
“The allocations are not arbitrary at all.  The SOA committee evaluates each application objectively looking for the benefits that the program or trip will provide to our campus,” said MUSG Communications Vice President and senior in the College of Communication Lauren Lakomek.
The MUSG SOA Committee makes the final decision on allocations. The committee is comprised of the Financial Vice President, Executive Vice President, Program Board Assistant, two Residential Senators, and two Academic Senators.  This year’s advisor for the committee is Kate Trevey, Coordinator for Student Organizations & Leadership for the Office of Student Development.  A week before every deadline, MUSG holds informational workshops for student organizations to educate them on the process.
“Its hard because you want to do a good job so your team may receive the most funding possible and yet unless the executive board before you leaves a sample of what they did its hard to know exactly how to write these out. MUSG holds a workshop on it and it is very helpful when you stop in their office but I think it would be very helpful if they posted some past requests they thought were well done,” said Marquette Crew President and senior in the College of Arts and Sciences Julie Knyszek.
In addition to workshops, this particular year the SOA Committee created a powerpoint presentation to give visual step by step instructions and information about the SOA process. This can be found on the MUSG Web site.
“The SOA budgetary process is divided into two lines; one for club sports and one for non-club sports.  Club sports have two deadlines throughout the year; one for the spring season and one for the fall season.  Non-club sports have eight period deadlines that they can apply for throughout the year,” said MUSG Financial Vice President and senior in the College of Business Administration Jonathan Giel . “During the fiscal year 2010, MUSG has successfully allocated to 58 student organizations totaling $60,383.14.”
Depending on whether or not the organization is in the non club sport or club sport categories, there are several deadlines throughout the year for each to respectively apply for funding. This year there are eight periods for non club sports and two periods for club sports. Each period is based on when the organization plans on having their event or activity. Though organizations are encouraged to apply for funding as early as possible, funding is generally given for specific events that the clubs plan on having. MUSG SOA funds speakers or educational events, documentaries and performances, advertising and publicity for events, and any event or services that are open to all of Marquette and enhance the community. For organizations that have more expenses this means working twice as hard on their SOA applications.
“I’m one of the co-presidents of the rowing team and because we are one of the most expensive club sports on campus, making sure we submit thorough and detailed funding requests is very important,” said Knyszek. “During the SOA funding workshops MUSG stresses that due to the large amount of clubs and requests they get the more detailed your request is, the better. Writing this out takes quite a bit of personal time because, at least for me, I know that the work I put in this could mean a big difference in dues for every member of our team. I would say so far the other co-president and I have spent about 6 hours on this and we are still not completely done yet.”
In terms of how decisions made, detail is considered a key factor in the allocation process. According to the MUSG SOA Committee, the more detail organizations put into their request the more prospective funding that can be received. The MUSG SOA said that although applications that do not provide complete event or season details are generally not given funding. A clear defined plan for each season with a through breakdown from tentative costs, to number of participants, to specific lodging and transportation details has a better chance of receiving more funding.
“Our goal as members of MUSG and the SOA Committee is to be financial stewards of the Student Activity Fee (SAF),” MUSG Executive Vice President and College of Business Administration senior Stephanie Stopka said. “We fully understand that it is our job to look at all of the applications with an impartial eye.  When discussing the applications we do not bring in any outside knowledge.  We only take into consideration the information that is provided on the application,” Stopka said. “The committee is looking to sponsor and support events that enhance the overall Marquette experience, aligned with the Jesuit ideals.”
However, not every organization will receive the funding they want or need. As the SOA Committee members are inclined to make decisions based on applications, they sometimes cannot give organizations all the funding they request. For these situations, there is an allocation appeals form that organizations can submit. Reasons for appeal include: the SOA Committee incorrectly deeming the application insufficient, the SOA Committee decision seeming arbitrary and inconsistent with similar funding decisions and practices, or MUSG not following its stated application procedures and policies.
Though the SOA typically covers organizations’ expenses towards their events, there are specific things the MUSG SOA cannot fund. These things include recruiting or fundraising events, capital goods (t-shirts or prizes), operating expenses (office supplies), non-current expenses (expenses that came outside of the current funding period), and any event that charges admission fees.
“In the past MUSG has been pretty helpful in allocating us money, I believe we are usually one of the clubs that receives the larger amounts of funding and every bit helps but it’s still hard because MUSG must split the fund between 250+ clubs on campus,” Knyszek said. “Because of the amount of clubs and the high expenses our club incurs any mention of reduction in club sports allocations is especially nerve-wrecking. Ultimately for the rowing team the amount of time we put in to the process is usually more than given back to us in allocation money it just comes at the end of the semester.”

Throughout the year Marquette’s student government (MUSG) sits down to discuss Student Organization Allocation (SOA) for recognized and registered student organizations on campus. With over 250 organizations,, each one is unique in terms of how much funding it needs in order to have a successful event or year.

“The allocations are not arbitrary at all.  The SOA committee evaluates each application objectively looking for the benefits that the program or trip will provide to our campus,” said MUSG Communications Vice President and senior in the College of Communication Lauren Lakomek.

The MUSG SOA Committee makes the final decision on allocations. The committee is comprised of the Financial Vice President, Executive Vice President, Program Board Assistant, two Residential Senators, and two Academic Senators.  This year’s advisor for the committee is Kate Trevey, Coordinator for Student Organizations & Leadership for the Office of Student Development.  A week before every deadline, MUSG holds informational workshops for student organizations to educate them on the process.

“Its hard because you want to do a good job so your team may receive the most funding possible and yet unless the executive board before you leaves a sample of what they did its hard to know exactly how to write these out. MUSG holds a workshop on it and it is very helpful when you stop in their office but I think it would be very helpful if they posted some past requests they thought were well done,” said Marquette Crew President and senior in the College of Arts and Sciences Julie Knyszek.

In addition to workshops, this particular year the SOA Committee created a powerpoint presentation to give visual step by step instructions and information about the SOA process. This can be found on the MUSG Web site.

“The SOA budgetary process is divided into two lines; one for club sports and one for non-club sports.  Club sports have two deadlines throughout the year; one for the spring season and one for the fall season.  Non-club sports have eight period deadlines that they can apply for throughout the year,” said MUSG Financial Vice President and senior in the College of Business Administration Jonathan Giel . “During the fiscal year 2010, MUSG has successfully allocated to 58 student organizations totaling $60,383.14.”

Depending on whether or not the organization is in the non club sport or club sport categories, there are several deadlines throughout the year for each to respectively apply for funding. This year there are eight periods for non club sports and two periods for club sports. Each period is based on when the organization plans on having their event or activity. Though organizations are encouraged to apply for funding as early as possible, funding is generally given for specific events that the clubs plan on having. MUSG SOA funds speakers or educational events, documentaries and performances, advertising and publicity for events, and any event or services that are open to all of Marquette and enhance the community. For organizations that have more expenses this means working twice as hard on their SOA applications.

“I’m one of the co-presidents of the rowing team and because we are one of the most expensive club sports on campus, making sure we submit thorough and detailed funding requests is very important,” said Knyszek. “During the SOA funding workshops MUSG stresses that due to the large amount of clubs and requests they get the more detailed your request is, the better. Writing this out takes quite a bit of personal time because, at least for me, I know that the work I put in this could mean a big difference in dues for every member of our team. I would say so far the other co-president and I have spent about 6 hours on this and we are still not completely done yet.”

In terms of how decisions made, detail is considered a key factor in the allocation process. According to the MUSG SOA Committee, the more detail organizations put into their request the more prospective funding that can be received. The MUSG SOA said that although applications that do not provide complete event or season details are generally not given funding. A clear defined plan for each season with a through breakdown from tentative costs, to number of participants, to specific lodging and transportation details has a better chance of receiving more funding.

“Our goal as members of MUSG and the SOA Committee is to be financial stewards of the Student Activity Fee (SAF),” MUSG Executive Vice President and College of Business Administration senior Stephanie Stopka said. “We fully understand that it is our job to look at all of the applications with an impartial eye.  When discussing the applications we do not bring in any outside knowledge.  We only take into consideration the information that is provided on the application,” Stopka said. “The committee is looking to sponsor and support events that enhance the overall Marquette experience, aligned with the Jesuit ideals.”

However, not every organization will receive the funding they want or need. As the SOA Committee members are inclined to make decisions based on applications, they sometimes cannot give organizations all the funding they request. For these situations, there is an allocation appeals form that organizations can submit. Reasons for appeal include: the SOA Committee incorrectly deeming the application insufficient, the SOA Committee decision seeming arbitrary and inconsistent with similar funding decisions and practices, or MUSG not following its stated application procedures and policies.

Though the SOA typically covers organizations’ expenses towards their events, there are specific things the MUSG SOA cannot fund. These things include recruiting or fundraising events, capital goods (t-shirts or prizes), operating expenses (office supplies), non-current expenses (expenses that came outside of the current funding period), and any event that charges admission fees.

“In the past MUSG has been pretty helpful in allocating us money, I believe we are usually one of the clubs that receives the larger amounts of funding and every bit helps but it’s still hard because MUSG must split the fund between 250+ clubs on campus,” Knyszek said. “Because of the amount of clubs and the high expenses our club incurs any mention of reduction in club sports allocations is especially nerve-wrecking. Ultimately for the rowing team the amount of time we put in to the process is usually more than given back to us in allocation money it just comes at the end of the semester.”

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Hometown baseball season is not finished

Posted on 09 October 2008 by Monica Stout

With the Brewers out of the playoffs, baseball in the city of Milwaukee may seem obsolete until next season. But for all baseball fans who want to go to a game instead of sit and watch it on the television, there is still one option open: Marquette Club Baseball.

Most Saturdays and Sundays from September through October, the MU Club Baseball team can be found at Harden Field, 3717 W. Howard Ave, just beyond Leon’s Frozen Custard Drive-In and St. Luke’s Hospital on the south side of Milwaukee.

These games are not just guys messing around on a baseball diamond. The talent and level of play on the field is on par with a NCAA Division III baseball team, as evidenced by MU Club Baseball’s recent win over Milwaukee Area Technical College, which is a Division III team.

“Almost everyone on the team could have played collegiate baseball at the Division III or Division II level,” said Tim Pauly, a junior on the team.
With a record of 8-4, there have been quite a few exciting moments already this season.

“Our team beat UW-Madison twice this September. Anthony Gattuso, team president, told us he has never beat Madison since joining the club team his freshman year. So, to beat a team that has had the upper hand over the years was a great accomplishment,” said Matthew Walters, a sophomore pitcher for the team.

“We beat Division III MATC two times and we have beaten conference powers Madison and UW-Milwaukee two times each also. All these wins were a result of excellent defense and fantastic pitching performances with a little clutch hitting sprinkled in there,” said Gattuso, the team manager and president.

These great moments on the diamond can be attributed to practice and good coaching. Practices usually run one to two hours, four times per week. Gattuso has his players “practice hard on doing the little things right.”

“I just try to help them be their best,” he said.

The guys on the team not only work hard during practice and games; they show how much they love the sport by covering the costs of travel, uniforms and equipment themselves. Marquette University only provides some funding for league fees, and allows the team to use the Helfaer Recreational Center and Valley Fields for practice.

“The university does help out, but the expenses of a club team are far more than what the university provides. When you see a club athlete participating, it’s because of the love of the game,” Walters said.

TJ Petullo, a junior on the team, describes how much he loves the game: “There are three things in my life which I truly love: God, my family and baseball. The only problem is, once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.

Despite the action, achievement and dedication that the MU Club Baseball team has put forth this year, the team still has trouble attracting fans to their games. Possible reasons for this range from the remote location of home games from campus and that most Marquette students do not even know that a Marquette baseball team exists.

Going to the home games at Harden Field may be a bit of a drive, but if a custard stop at Leon’s is made beforehand, it might just be worth it. And if enough people start coming, the baseball games could be moved to Valley Fields, where more Marquette students would be able to enjoy them.

“It’s fun to watch college athletes play baseball at a relatively high level,” said Jeff Parker, a sophomore first baseman on the team.

MU Club Baseball’s next home game is Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. against University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. If going home is not an option for fall break, maybe seeing a game at Harden Field will be.

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Congrats to MU Crew

Posted on 07 November 2007 by Mike Rudzinski

Dear Marquette, Winning first place in any sport isn’t easy, let alone winning first place in your sport in the largest competition in the world. The women’s crew team took first place in the Women’s Collegiate Four event at the Head of the Charles on October 20th. For those of you unfamiliar with the rowing community, the Head of the Charles is arguably the most prestigious rowing Regatta in the world next to the Olympics. Baseball has the World Series, football has the Super Bowl. Rowing has the Head of the Charles.

Equal competitive regattas are held in Britain and Canada, but none are as big as the Head of the Charles. The best and most talented teams compete in this race, and it’s an honor just to go.

Thanks to Katie Scheidemantel, Diana Mitsche, Mary Kaleta, Rachel Stoll, Julie Knyszek, Coach Ruth Blahnik and both Marquette Women’s and Men’s teams, Marquette can claim to be among the best in their sport. Such a feat deserves recognition from our community.

These five women truly exemplify what Marquette is all about. They all balance their school work and their training. Not too many students wake up five days a week for a 6 am practice.

Striving for excellence. The women’s crew team has accomplished this and has set an example for the rest of us to follow. So congratulations Katie, Diana, Mary, Rachel, Julie and the entire crew team for an amazing accomplishment. The Marquette community could not be more proud. Send your own congratulations to the team to: [email protected]

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Early to wake, early to row

Posted on 02 November 2007 by Peter Worth

t is a quiet, dark Wednesday morning in Milwaukee and a small group of Marquette students meet at 4:45 am to begin practice. Nope, it is not the men’s basketball team, but Marquette’s men’s varsity crew team.

Waking up early is just the beginning for the Crew Team. While a few members drive down to the boathouse, most of the team jogs from campus as a warm-up for their legs; as it will be the core and arms doing most of the work at practice. When all the members of the team arrive at the boathouse, the men go through a series of different stretches, as well as, understandably, a series of yawning.

The temperature at the boathouse does not help. Most of the team wears hoodies or Under Armour to dispell the cold air, but while the hardcore members are just in shorts and T-shirts.

But the team is used to all this by now. With practices at 5 a.m. Monday through Friday with days off only on Thursdays, the routine is not exactly a desirable one unless you are a passionate rower.

On this morning, it is easy to see Marquette has exactly 12 passionate rowers, as Wednesday is one of the last practices before the Head of the Charles Regatta, one of the most prestigious rowing tournaments in the world. The race will contain participants from colleges, high schools and rowing clubs from all over the world.

For the Regatta, the team will be split into two teams: the lightweights, an eightman team of freshmen through seniors and the openweights, a four-man team of mostly upperclassmen. Wednesday’s practice will also have this format.

Before they can jump into the water, the team must retrieve the boats. Inside the spacious boathouse are rows and rows of black and white eight and four member boats, as well as all of the oars and practice rowing machines. Although the warm-up has been fairly easy-going, it is here where the team gets down to business.

“Hands on, openweights,” says Brianne Garrett, head coxswain or the person who sets the pace of the row and steer the boat.

Garrett, a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences continues her instructions,“And up, side-step out… shoulders at split…over your head…and walk it out.”

When the boats are out, the two teams lock them down to the dock, fasten the oars and hop in the boat.

“Ready,” says Garrett, “One, two, and row.”

Both the lightweights and openweights plunge into the water and head down the river as coach Mary Spitzer, a recent graduate and a former rower herself follows in a white motorboat. On the way down the river, Spitzer follows the lightweights and their coxswain, Alec Hurley, a sophomore in the College of Communication.

Just five minutes into the practice, the looming Aurora Health Center and US Bank buildings come into view. But the lightweights only have eyes for the water, as the boat of eight men focus on Alec’s instructions of when to row and when to break.

But what the outside observer sees as fluid motion, Spitzer sees as slight inconsistency.

“John, back your blade down as you’re coming into the catch, you’re missing water,” she yells. “Roberto, slow down your knees and sit up tall. Make sure you’re not lunging.”

As they pass the lights of the Third Street Pier, John Hawks Pub and Milwaukee Public Market, it is clear Hurley is the one doing most of the talking.

“Just like that, every stroke, boys,” he says over his microphone headset.

In the eight-man boat, it is also Hurley’s job to call the numbers of the men telling them when to paddle. “Five, six, eight, on the feather,” he exclaims, telling his rowers to bring their oars back parallel to the water, or, the “feather.”

“You should be as square as you can… back that blade down,” he yells as the splash of the oars tries to drown out his voice. “Two, one, straighten ‘er out…reach out all the way as far back as you can.”

When they approach the spot where theywll be turning around, Hurley turns on the heat.

“Pick it up, all in unison! Finish together, under control gentlemen! Slow, don’t rush, slow, DRIVE!”

It is 5:45 a.m. and there is still no sign of the sun. Both of the teams have reached the very wide inner harbor just south of downtown. It is time to go back, but the pace is only about to increase.

Heading back up the river, the two teams prepare for what are known as “Power 10’s,” or 10 extra hard consecutive strokes that resemble a pace for the Regatta.

“Race it like a race,” yells out Spitzer from her boat. “Find what’s gonna work for you in your race and find that rate. Start it like you’re in the chute.”

The two boats line up side by side, but the openweights: captain Mike DeWilde, a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, Marc Khatchadourian, a senior in the College of Communications, John Modrzynski, a sophomore in the College of Engineering and John Westfall, a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences will be taking off first.

“You guys ready in back?,” yells Spitzer. “ROW!”

With a burst of speed, the four openweights zoom back up the river like men on a mission. They start so fast, Spitzer needs to floor her motorboat to catch up.

They continuously paddle back under all the bridges and the lights of the Milwaukee skyscrapers. With a fourman boat, there are no periods of rest for this group, but they are making it look easy.

The openweights are so steady that Garrett, their coxswain, is lying on her back in the stern like they have done this a million times.

“Keep it together, there we go, just like that,” she says through her headset. However, she is not completely happy with them.

“C’mon guys stop splashing,” she says. “If you guys splash me one more time…”

When the openweights start to approach the boathouse at 6:30 a.m., they will have already finished while both the Marquette women’s team and the Milwaukee Masters are still on the river. The sun is now completely out, providing a glimpse of what a beautiful day it will turn out to be.

Spitzer gets the group to convene. “I know Boston’s a big race and some of you might be nervous,” she says. “But you looked good today.”

But tomorrow is Thursday, so maybe then they can finally get some sleep.

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Treading up: Marquette water polo makes strides in first year of divisional play

Posted on 25 April 2007 by Peter Worth

How hard is it to start an expansion team? To find out, just ask Bob McNair and Bob Johnson, the Houston Texans’ and Charlotte Bobcats’ respective owners. If you need an even better example, shoot an e-mail to two-year owner Stuart Sternberg of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, whose team still hasn’t come close to even a glimpse of the Yankees’ living room from their nine-year crawlspace in the American League East.

Now, obviously the creation of a college club team is less difficult than that of a professional franchise, but the basics of starting a new team — finding players, facilities and financial means — are the same.

For the second-year Marquette water polo team, the transition has not only included accomplishing these three tasks, but also accomplishments where they count most: the pool.

Although the team was officially started last year, 2007 is considered the inaugural year of Marquette’s participation in the Great Plains Division of the Collegiate Water Polo Association (CWPA). The Golden Eagles finished with a more-than-respectable 10-6 fall season record in the division, which consists of Marquette, the University of Minnesota, Iowa State University, Kansas University and Minnesota State University at Mankato.

Success didn’t just accompany the approximately 20-member team in the regular season, however, as it reached the division championship in its first ever try, eventually falling to Minnesota 16-9. The great season was hopefully one of many to come, said club President, Founder and Treasurer Peter Mohan.

“We have a large recruiting hot-bed in Chicago, and once we tap into that potential, our team can be one of the top in the nation,” Mohan said. “I expect the team to grow every year in regards to popularity and skill, and hopefully next year with a good returning team we can make it to nationals.”

A win in next year’s division championship will give them that opportunity, which, if not for Mohan, would never have been a reality two years ago.

After gathering interest on www.Facebook.com and O-Fest, Mohan then had to ask the Recreational Sports Department for pool time, fill out paperwork to apply for club status and finally go in front of the club sports presidents for a majority vote.

“There was some dissent by some clubs because they felt we would be cutting into their money, but the majority was in our favor,” said Mohan.

Needless to say, he was glad it was.

“I really enjoy the sport and the opportunity was not offered here at Marquette,” said Mohan. “Plus, I knew there were a lot of people here that played water polo in high school.”

One such player is Davor Mitrovic, a four-year starter and All-State selection at Mount Carmel High School in Chicago and the 2006 Great Plains Division MVP.

“I think I was lucky to get selected,” Mitrovic said about his award. “The team was very balanced and everyone contributed; the other teams could not double team anyone because some one else would step up. Guys like Pete [Mohan] and Bob [Conrath] and Billy [Doerr] in the goal were a wall so we saved a lot of energy on defense because we knew if the other team got a shot off Billy could stop it.”

While the fall season is where most of the fierce competition takes place, the team is still active in the spring, and went 2-2 in a tournament at Iowa State the weekend of March 23, defeating St. John’s College of Minnesota as well as the host.

Like all new organizations, however, Marquette has faced some problems dealing with all of the facets that running a club entails. So far this spring the team had to cancel participation in tournaments two times; one for lack of members and the other for lack of transportation.

Nonetheless, Mohan has worked diligently in order to find quality and consistent competition for the team and his efforts have paid off. Marquette, despite not having adequate facilities on campus, will be hosting the 2007 Great Plains Division CWPA Championship at Schroeder YMCA in Brown Deer, a distance advantage the team surely will relish.

“Every other school in our division is at least a five-hour drive, so it will be easier for us to get in a rhythm before our games,” Mohan said. “Also, we should have the entire roster present; a benefit we don’t usually have.”

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Rugby team inspired by past season’s growth and progress

Posted on 03 May 2006 by Josette Goff

Rugby CoverIn the school year of 2003-2004, the Marquette University club rugby team had 35 members and not a single coach.

In the fall of this academic school year, Marquette University’s club rugby team celebrated its 30 year anniversary. The now 35 player team is anxious to continue its growth and progress. The highlight of this season was the team’s third place finish at the Mardi Gras Tournament in St. Louis. Next year they will have four coaches as well as eight returning seniors to lead the team.

“Hopefully for next season (next fall) we will have solid numbers at practice every day and we can make a run in the Wisconsin playoffs,” commented Tom Collins, a co-captain and junior in the College of Business Administration.

The team will have its work cut out for them due to the fact that they compete in one of the more competitive conferences in the Midwest.

Marquette Rugby“There are no easy games in the state of Wisconsin. We are a young team and need our younger guys to step up in the fall”, commented Ryan Hunter, co-captain and junior in the College of Communications.
With these goals in mind, the Marquette Rugby team has just purchased a new scrum set, similar to the equipment that football teams use to practice hitting. They owe the ability to invest in such equipment to the fundraising they did earlier this year. They’re working on similar opportunities that will insure future development.

“The improvement of our rookies this semester along with the new equipment we’ve purchased has raised the bar for the fall season,” said Drew McMillin, president of the Marquette rugby team and junior in the College of Arts and Sciences.
The team plays six to eight games each fall and spring season with roughly three home games hosted at King Field, located half a block north of 17th and Highland. In order to maintain high intensity during these games the team practices for a total of seven hours a week. This rigorous practice schedule is essential for such a complex game that many associate it with discipline, a strong work ethic and a tendency to be violent.

McMillin added, “with the talent of our players and the expertise of our coaches, we have the ability to win state next semester.”

New players are always welcome and are encouraged to show up at any of their practices. Mandatory practices are on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The next home game for the Marquette Rugby squad will be August 26th, 2006 at 1:00pm at King Field. They always appreciative of their fan base, and welcome any new spectators.

After all the hard work the current members have invested, they hope to see it pay off in the fall. As stated by Collins, “this will be the last year for a lot of guys and I know I want to go out on top and bring a good name to the club and school.”

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