Tag Archive | "Conservativism"

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My alternative lifestyle: College conservative

Posted on 16 April 2008 by Robert Fafinski

Iggy Pop, in his satirical song, “I’m a Conservative,” jokingly sang, “Conservatism ain’t no easy job.” And, on college campuses, he’s right. Being a conservative ain’t easy. Clearly, in my four years here at Marquette I’ve been out of the closet as a conservative. But, this “alternative lifestyle” I chose to engage in remains a mystery to some. So here’s a list of the basic reasons why I’m a conservative and you should be, too, even if it’s unpopular in academia’s culture of intolerance.

Freedom. As human beings, we are not entitled to things granted to us by a benevolent government. Instead, we are endowed by God with certain rights that the government cannot usurp. A liberal believes he can force something he deems to be good on people, but that necessitates stealing other’s freedom. As Barry Goldwater said, “A government that is big enough to give you all you want is big enough to take it all away.” So when you hear politicians promising things — from “free” health care to “free” college education — be skeptical. Most likely they are trying to buy votes with other people’s money to gain power and limit freedom.

Government isn’t good at “fixing” problems. I think Americans are largely a capable and caring people, sufficiently able to respond to the dire needs of the poor without involuntary compulsion. When government acts to “help” people, there are most often negative side effects. It’s a fact that we conservatives donate more money to charity than liberals. Conservatives see a societal ill and strive to fix it in the manner we see fit. Liberals may have the same endgoal in mind, but go about it through the government – that is, with others’ money.

The free market. I believe that each person is different, possessing unique strengths. The free market respects this diversity. Trying to pigeonhole a person is an assault on human dignity. This respect for diversity is best seen in the free market.

Fiscal Responsibility. Taxes are not good and should be low. When someone earns a dollar, it’s his. There needs to be a compelling reason to take a portion of it. High taxes are an assault on human dignity. They lower the value of hard work. Government can take a certain percentage of a person’s income. But, in order to be fair, it must be the same rate for all. Raising taxes on the “rich” will always score political points—no one sees himself as rich. But when politicians raise taxes disproportionately on the rich through the guise of the “common good,” it is no different than masked horsemen stealing from who they deem to be “too rich.”

Respect for the Second Amendment…Enjoying guns is one thing we can all understand. Something that liberals rarely understand is the role of firearms against tyrannical government. Firearms serve as our last defense against tyrannical governments. Without this basic understanding, there would be no United States. Raising arms against the British ensured the freedoms we now enjoy. This option must always be on the table. Goldwater, again: “Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.”

Free trade. Since the world is extremely diverse and good lies everywhere on the globe, liberalizing markets is key in providing a plethora of goods and services to all people of the world. It lowers prices, increases choice and creates wealth, which subsequently begets more wealth.

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“Unhinged” a wild tale about liberals

Posted on 30 November 2005 by Nathan Sawtelle

In Unhinged: Exposing Liberals Gone Wild, Michelle Malkin recounts a plethora of ludicrous assertions and dangerous stunts by Democrats that would leave any peace-loving Democrat feeling betrayed and leave Republicans frustrated with what it takes to have an equal voice in America.
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“Do As I Say, Not As I Do” well deserving of its high praises

Posted on 30 November 2005 by Justin Phillips

Members of the liberal left often exude an air of moral certitude. Priding themselves on commitment to the highest ideas, they are particularly confident of the purity of their motives and of the evil nature of their opponents. In his latest book, Do As I Say (Not As I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy, Peter Schweizer shows how many prominent liberals do not embody their enlightened views in their private lives. Continue Reading

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Taylor encourages Presidential support

Posted on 02 November 2005 by Diana Sroka

Sara Taylor, Political Director for the Bush Administration, urged Americans to recognize the President’s achievements and support his current efforts as she spoke to approximately 60 Wisconsin Republicans at the University Club in Milwaukee, October 25.

Taylor, 30, is the youngest political director to serve in political history. A native of Iowa, she gained notoriety as a pollster before entering the White House.
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Rand’s Atlas nothing to shrug about

Posted on 02 November 2005 by Luke Fuller

In Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand provides a compelling case for the moral supremacy of capitalism over collectivism; while this may be a good enough reason for some people to tackle the 1069 page behemoth, others might need further motivation. Fortunately for readers, Rand provides this additional motivation with a great plot that is driven not only by the merits of capitalism but also by intriguing characters.
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Santorum pokes fun at Clinton’s village in Family

Posted on 02 November 2005 by Mary Ellen Burke

In preparation for the 2006 gubernatorial race, Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) released his first book, It Takes a Family: Conservatism and the Common Good, in which he argues that strong families are vital to social welfare this past July.

The not so subtle title challenges Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s (D-N.Y.) It Takes a Village, published in 1996.

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Is it ok to nominate justices who share the President’s ideology? YES

Posted on 02 November 2005 by Jordan Olson

YES- Judicial activism has been a crucial instrument in keeping the constitution attuned to the will of the American people since the early 1800s. It is through the Supreme Court’s interpretation that the Constitution remains effectively relevant today.

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